National Capital Region | Virginia Tech

National Capital Region Highlights

Doctoral student Susan Branco Alvarado receives Minority Fellowship Program award from National Board for Certified Counselors

Susan Branco Alvarado

The NBCC Foundation, the non-profit affiliate of the National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC), has selected Susan Branco Alvarado for the National Board for Certified Counselors Minority Fellowship Program (NBCC MFP). Alvarado is currently pursuing a doctoral degree in counselor education and supervision at Virginia Tech in the National Capital Region.

As a NBCC MFP fellow, Alvarado will receive $20,000 to support her education and facilitate her service to underserved minority populations. She is one of 22 doctoral-level counseling students selected to receive the fellowship award.

The NBCC MFP is made possible by a grant awarded to NBCC by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) in August 2012. The foundation is contracted by NBCC to administer the NBCC MFP, as well as training and collaboration activities, such as webinars, that are open to all National Certified Counselors.


The Beam sheds new light on long distance video communication at the Northern Virginia Center

Dr. Wong and Dr. Sands

The BeamPro robot is sparking a lot of interest at the Virginia Tech Northern Virginia Center (NVC) in Falls Church, drawing praise from faculty, staff, students, and guest lecturers as a better way to personalize long distance video communication.

The 10-inch LCD flat-panel screen Beam allows interaction with remote locations by coupling high-end video and audio with the freedom of motion to move about a space.

“Because the Beam is so flexible, it can go directly into classrooms and meetings to discuss service and training,” said Jim Murphy, telecommunications specialist, Digital Media Services, at the NVC. “Someone at a remote location can actually look over your shoulder and help you find a solution to a technical problem and this is a big plus over other long distance video technologies like polycom, for example.“


10-day international residency distinguishes Executive Master of Natural Resources program; students work with global partners on best practices for sustainability

2011_2012_Cohort

For the past three years, Virginia Tech’s Executive Master of Natural Resources (XMNR) -- an accelerated graduate degree program of the Center for Leadership in Global Sustainability (CLiGS) designed for full-time working professionals in business, government, and non-profit organizations focused on leadership for sustainability -- has sent a cohort of students on a 10-day international residency (IR) to Yunnan Province, China, to focus on sustainable development opportunities and challenges in the region.


Joe Schilling and Susan Piedmont-Palladino discuss sustainable urban design with D.C. architects

Clancy_Benson

The Sustainable Design Committee at Washington, D.C.- based Hickok Cole Architects invited Joe Schilling, research assistant professor and director of the Metropolitan Institute at Virginia Tech, and Susan Piedmont-Palladino, professor of architecture and director of the Urban Design Program at the Washington-Alexandria Architecture Center, to participate in a new seminar series designed to engage the firm’s 90 architects in a range of sustainable urban design issues.

“Many of my colleagues hear about sustainable issues [on a larger scale] but we as a committee fear they don’t fully understand how at the smaller scale, and in our profession, we can actually make a difference,” said Lindsey Falasca, RA, LEED AP, in explaining the goal of the seminar series, which she coordinates.


Two NCR electrical and computer engineering professors garner dean’s awards

Clancy_Benson

At the seventeenth annual Virginia Tech College of Engineering faculty reception, Dean Richard Benson presented awards to engineering professors for teaching innovation, research, service, and outreach for 2014. Two of the recipients are from the National Capital Region.

Charles Clancy, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering, Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), was one of five professors honored with the Dean’s Award for Research Excellence. Clancy, who also serves as director of the Hume Center, has established ECE partnerships with L-3 Communications and with the Security and Software Engineering Research Center (a National Science Foundation Industry/University Cooperative Research Center). His office is located at the Virginia Tech Research Center — Arlington.


Neil Bradish receives 2014 Outstanding Staff Award at National Capital Region Staff Appreciation Day celebration

Neil Bradish

Likened in a nomination letter to a rescuer who shows up to help after just one call, Neil Bradish, junior systems administrator at the Northern Virginia Center (NVC), has received the National Capital Region 2014 Outstanding Staff Award. The award presentation was made last week by Steve McKnight, vice president of the National Capital Region, during a Staff Appreciation Day celebration held at the NVC.

The award – which carries a $500 prize – was initiated nine years ago to recognize "consistent exceptional service to the university."


Virginia Tech Applied Research Corporation announces logo contest winners

Emylee Esteban

The Virginia Tech Applied Research Corporation (VT-ARC) has announced that Emylee Esteban, of Gainesville, Va., and Rebecca Grogan, of Woodbine, Md., both visual communication design majors, are the winners of a contest to design eye-catching logos for two VT-ARC projects. Esteban designed the winning logo for the Business Analytics Cell (BAC) and Grogan submitted the top design for the Business Analytics Tool (BAT).

The contest was open to all current students and faculty at Virginia Tech and entrants were instructed to submit only original designs. The winning logos may appear on high traffic websites, social media platforms, print materials, and other mediums.


Department of Energy awards Dominion $47 million for wind project; Advanced Research Institute has key role

Saifur Rahman

The federal Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded Richmond-based Dominion Virginia Power an additional $47 million over the next four years to help fund the construction of a 12-megawatt offshore wind turbine demonstration project off the coast of Virginia Beach.

Dominion was one of three companies -- out of seven finalists -- to advance to the second phase of demonstration.

The Dominion-led Virginia Offshore Wind Technology Advancement Project (VOWTAP) consists of two 6-megawatt, direct-drive offshore wind turbines that will produce enough electricity to power up to 3,000 homes. It will be located in federal waters about 24 miles off the coast of Virginia Beach, directly adjacent to the commercial area Dominion is leasing from the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management.


David Levy joins Hume Center as associate director of research in cybersecurity

Ridenour

David Levy has been named the first associate director of research in cybersecurity at the Ted and Karyn Hume Center for National Security and Technology.

Levy will oversee the center’s growing portfolio of research in cybersecurity and analytics and will be located at the Virginia Tech Research Center — Arlington.

He will actively pursue research, development, and outreach activities with national security agencies and the companies that support them.

“To keep pace with the rapid growth of the Hume Center, we identified a need for senior leadership in the cybersecurity field,” said center director Charles Clancy. “We welcome Dr. Levy to the team, and eagerly anticipate his contributions as we continue our mission of educating the next generation of leaders in national security technologies through curricular, extra-curricular, and innovative research.”


James Muetzel named student speaker for National Capital Region commencement ceremony

Ridenour

James Muetzel, who has completed the Ph.D. program in the Center for Public Administration and Policy (CPAP), will be the student speaker at the 34th National Capital Region Commencement on Sunday, May 18. The ceremony begins at 1:30 p.m. at the Center for the Arts in Fairfax, Va.

Patrick Roberts, associate professor and associate chair and program director for CPAP, nominated Muetzel for this honor.

Muetzel is currently a senior counsel in the Office of the General Counsel (OGC) at the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM), responsible for providing strategic legal advice to OPM executives and managers on a variety of matters, such as fiscal law and procurement, interagency agreements, public-private collaboration, and insurance.


Ridenour Faculty Fellowship Conference moves to National Capital Region in fall 2014; winning research teams will participate in workshops

Ridenour

The Ridenour Faculty Fellowship Conference (RFFC) – designed to foster the creative advancement of interdisciplinary faculty and students in the School of Public and International Affairs (SPIA) in public administration and policy, urban and regional planning, and government and international affairs – is moving from Blacksburg to the National Capital Region for the Fall 2014 session with a new component that further enhances its focus. The two-day conference will convene at the Virginia Tech Research Center — Arlington on Oct, 23 supported in part by the Virginia Tech National Capital Region Office of the Vice President.

The 2014 conference, the third in the series, will explore the urgency of problems associated with resilience. “While the conference will continue to feature key speakers and panel participants from academia, politics, and the corporate world, the new program format will also allow two winning research groups to organize parts of the conference with guest speakers and workshops that help them realize the next steps of their projects,” said Anne Khademian, director of SPIA.


Harold Post and Occoquan Watershed Monitoring Laboratory celebrate 30 years of history

Harold_Post

In 1984 when Virginia Tech began experimenting with IBM personal computers for engineering faculty and students, the Occoquan Watershed Monitoring Laboratory (OWML) in Manassas – which opened in 1972 -- was among the first research facilities in the university to get an IBM XT computer. The IBM salesperson delivered the computer in person, curious to see who had ordered this expensive machine. This opportunity for OWML to be at the forefront of cutting edge technology coincided with the arrival of Harold Post as a research associate and field operations supervisor. This year, Post marks 30 years of pioneering with the OWML.


Barbara Allen gives NSF Distinguished Lecture; explores ethics and social justice in post-Katrina neighborhoods

Barabra Allen

Concepts of ethics and justice, while related, represent different theoretical traditions and emphases. Ethics typically involves concepts of right and wrong conduct. Justice, on the other hand, is concerned with concepts of fairness and emphasizes power, norms, and institutions.

Barbara Allen, professor and co-director of the Virginia Tech Science and Technology in Society graduate program in the National Capital Region, explored these concepts during a lecture at the National Science Foundation (NSF) in Arlington, Va., last week. As guest speaker for the NSF Distinguished Lecture Series in Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences, Allen compared two communities in post-Hurricane Katrina during her presentation, “Beyond Ethics: Questions at the Intersection of Science, Technology and Social Justice.”


Visibility for Metropolitan Institute soars when Associated Press quotes director Joe Schilling

Joe Schilling

Visibility for the Metropolitan Institute at Virginia Tech reached new heights last week when, within a few hours, about 600 media outlets posted an Associated Press article, “Home demolitions turn Detroit into blank canvas,” quoting Joe Schilling, assistant research professor and director of the institute. The story covered the on-going efforts to transform distressed neighborhoods in Detroit, in this case a major effort to tear down hundreds of vacant homes in the Brightmoor area. The city and its residents hope that this will be a catalyst for the rebuilding and redesign of their neighborhood.


School of Architecture + Design expands WAAC library with Marco Frascari collection; symposium in his name held this week

building

The College of Architecture and Urban Studies in association with University Libraries of Virginia Tech recently purchased the Marco Frascari Library Collection from his widow, Paola Frascari. The collection will rejoin the books Marco Frascari donated to the Virginia Tech Washington-Alexandria Architecture Center (WAAC) library when he served as the G.T. Ward Professor of Architecture at the WAAC (1998-2005).

Marco Frascari passed away in 2013 in Ottawa, Canada, where he was director of the Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism at Carleton University.


College of Engineering ranked 21st among nation’s best for graduate studies; four programs offered in the National Capital Region

Ken Harmon Speaking

Virginia Tech’s College of Engineering ranks 21st among the nation’s best engineering schools for graduate studies, according to U.S. News and World Report’s America’s Best Graduate Schools 2015 survey released this week. The ranking is a move up three places from 24th where the college stood for three consecutive years.

Among public universities, the College of Engineering’s graduate program – which has more than 2,000 students -- ranks 10th in the nation. It is the highest-ranked engineering school in Virginia.


Susan Piedmont-Palladino plays part in choosing architect for renovation of historic Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library

Susan Piedmont-Palladino

It was of particular significance to Susan Piedmont-Palladino when Washington, D.C., officials announced that the Washington-based architectural firm Martinez + Johnson and Netherlands-based Mecanoo Architecture had been chosen to renovate, and possibly expand, the Mies van de Rohe building that the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library has called home since 1972.

Piedmont-Palladino was there when Mayor Vincent Gray and Chief Librarian Joi Mecks announced the selection. A professor at the Washington-Alexandria Architecture Center (WAAC), she was one of seven members – and the only architect -- on the Technical Evaluation Committee appointed to help make the final decision.


Ken Harmon appointed to INCOSE advisory board and council; first to represent Virginia Tech

Ken Harmon

Ken Harmon Jr., an associate professor with the Virginia Tech Grado Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, has been appointed to the Corporate Advisory Board and Academic Council of the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE), the first person to represent Virginia Tech in that capacity.

At Virginia Tech Harmon has served for more than 20 years as the director of the Grado Department’s extended campus program, which includes systems engineering and engineering administration graduate programs in the National Capital Region. His research focuses on systems engineering and technology management.


Guest speaker Congressman John Dingell shares insights from 58 years of service with Virginia Tech EMBA students

Nick Stone

During the latest session of the Executive MBA (EMBA) Lunch and Learn Series last week, Jennifer Dingell, senior manager for Information Systems at General Dynamics Information Technology and a current student in Virginia Tech’s EMBA program, proudly introduced her father, Congressman John Dingell, as someone who has helped shape policy in almost every aspect of American life during his continuous 58 years of service in the House of Representatives. She cited just a few of the important areas where his voice and contributions to legislation have been influential – civil rights, health care, defense, clean air and water, and conservation.


Nick Stone named director of National Capital Region Operations

Nick Stone

Nick Stone has been named director of National Capital Region Operations (NCRO), effective February 1. In this capacity, he will oversee operations in the Virginia Tech Research Center – Arlington, serving as university liaison with the Virginia Tech Foundation; managing policies relating to allocation of space to programs; and acting as liaison to the Executive Briefing Center on the second floor of the facility. He will report to the vice president for the National Capital Region (NCR).

Working with the vice president for the region, Stone is also responsible for enhancing the identity, opportunity, and operational efficiency of National Capital Region programs within the region, including information technology, emergency preparedness, security, and facilities. In addition, Stone will work with the vice president for the NCR to support initiatives in government relations, university relations, outreach, graduate education, and research. He will identify and pursue opportunities relating to advanced technology in the NCR, developing network relations with appropriate federal agencies, local government, and industry partners.


Preserving African American heritage sparks thoughtful and lively discussion during launch of Urban Design Seminar Series in Alexandria

Audrey Davis

A discussion on "African American Heritage: How Is It Represented in the Public Realm and How Does It Affect Planning and Development in the D.C. Region?” was held last week, launching an Urban Design Seminar Series entitled Conversations on the Public Realm in the DC Region. Four more events are planned during the spring semester.

The series is sponsored by the School of Public and International Affairs and the Washington-Alexandria Architecture Center. Elizabeth Morton, professor of practice in urban affairs and planning, who is organizing the seminars, explained that these events are designed to emphasize the common concerns that run through various disciplines. “Sometimes we just get very involved in our own areas of curriculum and research and forget how much we can benefit from sharing ideas with one another,” Morton said. She added, “We also gain so much from these opportunities to share ideas with the community. One of the most important goals of these sessions is to strengthen our relationships with practitioners and advocates, and we hope these conversations spark further collaboration.”


Ralph Buehler receives award from Transportation Research Board special task force for paper related to climate change

Buehler and Noland

The Transportation Research Board (TRB) of the National Academies Special Task Force on Climate Change and Energy has awarded the "Best Paper on a Topic Addressing Climate Change Issues" to Ralph Buehler, associate professor, Urban Affairs and Planning Program. Buehler accepted the award during the TRB’s recent annual meeting in Washington, D.C., attended by nearly 12,000 U.S. and international transportation experts.

To identify the best paper dealing with climate change issues submitted for this year’s annual meeting, the task force solicited best paper recommendations from all of the committees within the TRB, not just the one specific to climate change and energy.


DARPA Deputy Director Dr. Geoffrey Ling to discuss revolutionary prosthetics program and President Obama’s BRAIN Initiative on Feb. 6

Dr. Ling

Dr. Geoffrey Ling, M.D., Ph.D., deputy director of the Defense Sciences Office at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), professor of neurology at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, and attending neuro critical care physician at Johns Hopkins Hospital, will be the next guest speaker for the National Capital Region Science and Technology Leadership Series 2014.

Dr. Ling will present "Lessons from DARPA's Revolutionizing Prosthetics program and new investments under the President's BRAIN Initiative" on Thursday, Feb. 6, from 4 to 6 p.m., at the Virginia Tech Research Center — Arlington, 900 N. Glebe Road, 2nd floor.


National Capital Region professor Giselle Datz among faculty receiving research funding from Global Issues Initiative

Giselle Datz

Giselle Datz, associate professor, School of Public and International Affairs, National Capital Region, is among Virginia Tech faculty who will receive research funding from the Institute for Society, Culture and Environment Global Issues Initiative (GII) 2013-2014 Research Support Program (RSP).

Datz will study “The Political Economy of Pension Finance in Latin America.” Her project is aimed at explaining new developments in pension finance in Brazil, Argentina, Chile, and Mexico from the early 1990s to present. She will develop a qualitative comparative analysis of these four case studies focused on micro-institutional dynamics. This study will identify the roles being played by pension savings and examine how they are increasingly functioning as economic policy tools to achieve different objectives, from domestic investment financing and deficit reduction to deepening financialization. Developing an understanding of pensions as financial arrangements will provide a window into the diverse evolving modes of interactions between states and markets in Latin America. Datz will also explore the concepts of pension fund developmentalism (where the public sector has influence over pension funds’ investment strategies and private-public institutional arrangements are blurred) and statism (where the state regains control over previously privatized mandatory pension savings).


Sandeep Shukla named IEEE Fellow

Sandeep Shukla

Sandeep Shukla, professor of electrical and computer engineering at Virginia Tech in the National Capital Region, has been named an Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Fellow for contributions to applied probabilistic model checking for system design.

The status of Fellow is one of the most prestigious honors of the institute, bestowed upon less than one-tenth of one percent of the annual voting membership of IEEE.

Shukla has been a co-founder, deputy director and director of the Center for Embedded Systems for Critical Applications (CESCA) at Virginia Tech. He is also the founding director of the Formal Engineering Research with Models, Abstractions and Transformations (FERMAT) laboratory, based at the Virginia Tech Research Center — Arlington.


Jennifer Barrett named Theodora Ayer Randolph Professor of Equine Surgery

VCE photo

Jennifer Barrett, associate professor of equine surgery in the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine at Virginia Tech, was recently named Theodora Ayer Randolph Professor of Equine Surgery by the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors.

The Theodora Ayer Randolph Professorship of Equine Surgery was established by its namesake to attract and retain eminent scholars to the Marion DuPont Scott Equine Medical Center. The recipient will hold the position for a period of three years.

A member of the Virginia Tech faculty since 2007, Barrett's research has focused on regenerative medicine and she has quickly become a leading expert in this equine discipline.


Virginia Cooperative Extension showcases programs in Arlington and Alexandria

VCE photo

Virginia Cooperative Extension serving Arlington County and the City of Alexandria showcased its programs during a breakfast meeting for about 70 invited guests held in Arlington last week. Virginia Cooperative Extension, founded in 1914, brings the resources of Virginia's land-grant universities, Virginia Tech and Virginia State University, to the people of the commonwealth.

Through a network of 854 locally trained volunteers who contributed 32,129 volunteer hours, Virginia Cooperative Extension in Arlington and Alexandria led 654 public education programs last year, providing nearly 51,000 people with valuable and practical information to help improve their lives.


Kostas Triantis named John L. Lawrence Professor of Industrial Engineering and Operations Research

Kostas Triantis

Kostas Triantis, professor of industrial and systems engineering in the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech, was recently named John L. Lawrence Professor of Industrial Engineering and Operations Research by the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors.

The John L. Lawrence Professorship of Industrial Engineering and Operations Research recognizes research excellence and was endowed by its namesake, a 1948 graduate of the industrial engineering program, who is now deceased.

A member of the Virginia Tech faculty since 1983 and based at Virginia Tech's Northern Virginia Center in the National Capital Region, Triantis has established a research program in the design of performance measurement systems for service and manufacturing organizations and for engineering systems.


Master of architecture graduate Ben Samson finds celebrity as his thesis goes viral

Ben Samson

Ben Samson is becoming a household name in his hometown of Pittsburgh -- and beyond -- as the thesis for his master of architecture degree at the Washington-Alexandria Architecture Center continues to go viral. The idea that’s getting all the attention: a light rail public transportation system for the city he grew up in.

“Pittsburgh is a great city with lots of different neighborhoods, kind of like a patchwork. My goal in the thesis was to come up with a comprehensive transportation system that would stitch them all together,” said Samson, who graduated from Virginia Tech in May 2012 and worked at the Alexandria-based Kulinski Group Architects before recently moving back to Pittsburgh. Samson's thesis further explored how an area of the city could be redeveloped around its rail stop, using Pittsburgh’s Strip District as a model.


CommonHealth offers valuable tips on 'Getting Your Zzzz....' at two sessions in the National Capital Region on Nov. 20

CommonHealth Sleep Image

If you toss and turn at night, you’re not alone. According to the National Sleep Foundation, approximately 20 million adults in the U.S. have difficulty falling asleep and/or staying asleep. Growing research indicates that chronic lack of sleep increases risk of cardiovascular disease (along with obesity, diabetes, and infections). Sleep gives the heart and vascular system a much-needed rest, as heart rate and blood pressure progressively slow as you enter deeper sleep.

CommonHealth Regional Coordinator Amy Moore will offer Virginia Tech employees tips on how to change sleep routine, improve overall health, and have "sweet dreams" when she visits the National Capital Region on Wednesday, Nov. 20, to talk about “Getting Your Zzzz….CommonHealth’s Guide to Healthy Sleep.” Time will be allotted for discussion following Moore’s presentation.


Marcia Feuerstein co-edits collection of essays: ‘Architecture as a Performing Art’

Marcia Feuerstein

A new collection of essays that advances architectural theory, history, and criticism by proposing the lens of performance as a way of engaging the multiple roles buildings can play without reducing them to functional categories is co-edited by Marcia Feuerstein, associate professor at the Virginia Tech Washington-Alexandria Architecture Center, and Gray Read, associate professor at Florida International University. “Architecture as a Performing Art,” published by Ashgate Press, casts architecture as spatial action rather than as static form and opens a promising avenue for future investigation.

The essays reveal a deep alliance between architecture and the performing arts, uncovering its roots in ancient stories, and tracing a continuous tradition of thought that emerges in contemporary practice. With fresh insight, the authors ask how buildings perform with people as partners, rather than how they look as formal compositions. The focus is on actions: the door that offers the possibility of making a dramatic entrance, the window that frames a scene, and the city street that is transformed in carnival. The essays also consider the design process as a performance improvised among many players and offer examples of recent practice that integrates theater and dance.


Largest daily newspaper in Bosnia-Herezegovina interviews critical geopolitics expert Gerard Toal

Gerard Toal

A feature interview with Gerard Toal, an internationally recognized expert in critical geopolitics, appeared recently in the weekend supplement of Dnevni Avaz, the largest daily newspaper in Bosnia-Herezegovina, Sarajevo. For two decades, Toal, professor and director of the Government and International Affairs program in the National Capital Region, has conducted research on the Bosnian region, which he first visited in 1981 on a bus tour from London to Athens.

The article is a discussion of Toal’s research findings over his two decades of research on the country. It begins with Toal’s initial work on U.S. foreign policy and Bosnia in the early 1990s before considering his research on refugee returns in Bosnia-Herezegovina -- conducted with Virginia Tech graduate Carl T. Dahlman, a professor at Miami University, Ohio -- between 2002 and 2005. This research led to a number of articles and subsequently the book, “Bosnia Remade: Ethnic Cleansing and Its Reversal,” which encompasses the period from the late 1980s. Published by Oxford University Press in 2011, it is the first authoritative account of ethnic cleansing and its aftermath. Subsequent research by Toal on Republika Srpska and the future of Bosnia, which appeared in January 2013, was quickly translated into Bosnian and published this summer.


Center for Leadership in Global Sustainability announces four new affiliates to expert network

Cligs Logo

The Center for Leadership in Global Sustainability (CLiGS) has named four new affiliates – three fellows and one associate -- who will partner within the center's network of experts to contribute to the mission of building leadership for global sustainability through engagement, research, teaching, and relationship-building around the world.


Virginia Tech partners in study with Arlington Food Assistance Center; finds 31,500 Arlingtonians are food insecure

Food insecuirty

Despite being one of the wealthiest counties in the nation, food insecurity -- measured by limited or uncertain access to food, reduced food intake, and disrupted eating patterns -- affects slightly more than four in 10 of Arlington County residents in the $60,000 and under income group. This was the major finding of a study conducted by the nonprofit Arlington Food Assistance Center (AFAC) in partnership with the Virginia Tech Center for Survey Research (CSR) and the Center for Public Administration and Policy (CPAP), a program in the Virginia Tech School of Public and International Affairs (SPIA) in the National Capital Region.

With roughly 75,000 Arlington residents in this income category, this study suggests as many as 42 percent or 31,500 of these individuals could experience food insecurity – a greater level of food insecurity than previous data suggested.


NGA Director Letitia Long will launch 2013-14 Science and Technology Leaders Series Nov. 5

Leticia Long

Letitia Long

Letitia Long, director of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), will be the first speaker for the 2013-14 Science and Technology Leaders Series sponsored by the office of the vice president in the National Capital Region.

A Virginia Tech alumna, Long will present “Turning NGA’s Challenges Into Transformational Opportunities,” on Tuesday, Nov. 5, from 4 to 7 p.m., at the Virginia Tech Research Center — Arlington. Long will discuss the challenges and opportunities of leadership in the intelligence community, including delivering timely, relevant, accurate, actionable geospatial intelligence (GEOINT); making GEOINT accessible online, on-demand to customers; supporting mission partners, especially the warfighter; and acting as the driver toward a new dimension of intelligence.


EMBA alum Rich Twilley launches Roughy Toys, a company that makes kids smile and gives back

Boy with toys

Fueled by social responsibility, Virginia Tech alum Rich Twilley is using his entrepreneurial skills and spirit to launch a new company, Roughy Toys, which gives a toy to a child in need for each one that it sells.

The idea sparked while Twilley was a student in the Virginia Tech Pamplin College of Business Executive MBA (EMBA) program in the National Capital Region. The 18-month cohort program includes an international residency which found Twilley visiting the favelas (slums) of Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo, Brazil. There he witnessed children in extreme poverty and decided he wanted to do something for children in such need. But he wasn’t quite sure what -- at least not yet.

Back in the United States, he read the book “How Children Succeed,” which intrigued him. The book focused on the importance of education but, even more importantly, on the development of character. It also set forth the idea that reducing chronic stress and alleviating the impact of poverty can help build strong character, especially at an early age.


Winning design in Charles W. Steger Design Competition implemented at Virginia Tech Research Center — Arlington

Hallway

A winning design entry in the Charles W. Steger Design Competition, initiated to showcase the dynamic intersection between science, design, and art in the Virginia Tech Research Center — Arlington, has inspired “waved” photo displays in the public hallways of the building's second-floor executive briefing center.

Nine photo installations interspersed in the wall “cubbies” that line the hallways offer one picture approaching from the left and a totally different image when approached from the right side. For example, the observer will see a photo of the Lincoln Memorial when walking down the hallway from the right and a photo of National Capital Region graduate students conducting a survey at a Capital Bikeshare stand in Washington, D.C., when approaching from the left.


Mahmood Khan to serve on governing council for management institute in India

Randall Murch

Mahmood Khan, professor of hospitality and tourism management, Pamplin College of Business in the National Capital Region, has been invited to serve on the governing council for the Institute for International Management and Technology (IIMT) School of Management in India. The institute’s vision is to set a global standard of applied education and a mindset of lifelong learning by creating a sustained climate that nurtures change.

The institute’s post graduate management program offered by the School of Management and Entrepreneurship and the School of Hospitality and Tourism Management was recently approved by the All India Council for Technical Education (AICTE), Department of Higher Education, under the Ministry of Human Resource Development.

Khan, who often lectures at international conferences, workshops, and seminars, most recently served as a keynote speaker for an international conference on sustainability and tourism held in Yerevan, Armenia. This conference was supported by the U.S. Embassy in Turkey with the purpose of establishing collaboration with educational institutes in Armenia and Turkey. At this conference, Khan was asked to assess the progress of this project and submit a final report to the embassy.


Randy Murch to give keynote at microbial forensics workshop in Croatia

Randall “Randy” Murch, associate director for Research Program Development at Virginia Tech in the National Capital Region, will give the keynote address at the International Workshop on Microbial Forensics Grand Science Challenges. The workshop will be held in Zagreb, Croatia, October 13-16.

Randall Murch

About 40 invited attendees will convene to focus on science, biodefense, biosecurity, and the non-proliferation of international bioweapons. The event is funded by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency via the Naval Postgraduate School under the auspices of the U.S. National Academies in collaboration with the Croatian Academy of Sciences.

“Microbial forensics” was created in 1996 to provide scientific support to the investigation and prosecution of crimes and terrorist acts involving bacterial, viral, and fungal pathogens and biological toxins that affect humans and economically important animals and plants. In the 17 years since its birth and its use in thousands of hoax, low level criminal cases and bioterrorism events of the magnitude of the anthrax mailing cases of 2001 in the U.S., knowledge gaps have been realized but much has been learned.


Virginia Tech welcomes foreign journalists to Arlington for briefing on nuclear energy

Alireza Haghighat

The Virginia Tech Research Center — Arlington recently hosted 11 foreign journalists (five from India, two from Poland, and one from Slovakia, Japan, Taiwan, and the Czech Republic) as part of a Nuclear Energy Reporting Tour sponsored by the Department of State. The objective was to help the visitors understand and accurately cover nuclear energy issues, specifically America's leadership in the nuclear industry and the latest technologically integrated safety features. While these journalists are experienced in reporting on nuclear energy, they benefitted from exposure to discussions about the nuclear energy field in the U.S. and advancements that have been made.


Janet Abbate named co-director of Science and Technology Studies in National Capital Region

Gerard Toal

Associate Professor Janet Abbate has joined Barbara Allen as co-director of the Science and Technology Studies graduate program in the National Capital Region.

Science and Technology Studies is a growing field that draws on the full range of disciplines in the social sciences and humanities to examine the ways that science and technology shape, and are shaped by, society, politics, and culture. The curriculum explores contemporary controversies, historical transformations, policy dilemmas, and broad philosophical questions and prepares students to be productive and publicly-engaged scholars, advancing research and making a difference.


Joe Schilling discusses new urban agriculture movement at congressional briefing

Gerard Toal

“A growing number of nonprofits are reclaiming vacant lots and brownfields with locally grown foods and forests as part of a new urban agriculture movement,” Joe Schilling, research assistant professor and interim director of the Metropolitan Institute, said recently at a Congressional Soils Caucus Alliance (CSCA) briefing.

The briefing -- “From Vacant Lots to Vegetable Plots: Converting Brownfields to Urban Wealth” -- was co-sponsored by the House of Representatives Urban Caucus, American Society of Agronomy (ASA), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), and Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) to explain the benefits of converting some of the approximately 450,000 brownfield sites (abandoned or underused spaces where redevelopment may be complicated by real or perceived environmental contamination) into verdant fruit and vegetable gardens.


Gerard Toal’s book wins Silver Award from Association for Borderlands Studies

Gerard Toal

Bosnia Remade: Ethnic Cleansing and its Reversal (Oxford University Press, 2011), coauthored by Gerard Toal, professor and program director, Government and International Affairs, and Carl T. Dahlman, associate professor at Miami University, Ohio, has been awarded the Association for Borderlands Studies Past Presidents’ 2013 Silver Award.

The award is presented to any published monographic (single or multiple authored, including edited) book in the social and natural sciences and humanities involving original research on borders, borderlands, and border regions that has been reviewed in the Journal of Borderlands Studies.


Saifur Rahman honored with Outstanding Power Engineering Educator award from IEEE Power & Energy Society

Dr. Rahman and Noel Schultz

Saifur Rahman, Joseph R. Loring Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and director of the Virginia Tech Advanced Research Institute, has received the IEEE Power & Energy Society Outstanding Power Engineering Educator award. Rahman accepted the award from Noel Schulz, president of the IEEE Power & Energy Society, during a ceremony last week at the 2013 IEEE Power & Energy Society General Meeting in Vancouver, Canada.


Two National Capital Region graduate students awarded scholarships
by local Virginia Tech alumni association

Two doctoral candidates in the National Capital Region have been granted $2,000 scholarships from the National Capital Region (NCR) Chapter of the Virginia Tech Alumni Association. Susan Branco Alvarado, pursuing a degree in counselor education and supervision, and Amy Paige Kaminski, in science and technology studies, are recipients of the 2013-2014 awards.

Both students are in the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences located at the Northern Virginia Center in Falls Church.

Susan Alvarado

The local alumni association raises money for its scholarship program through a number of fund- raising activities, most notably an annual job fair held in the spring.

Keith Stemple, chair of the scholarship committee, said that this year brought the largest number of graduate applications since the program was expanded three years ago to include students enrolled in National Capital Region graduate programs. Previously, the program initiated by the alumni association in 2002 was open only to undergraduates in the region who plan to attend Virginia Tech.


WAAC librarian Marlene Koenig is no stranger when it comes to royal history

“One day you will be back in Belgrade living in the palace and I expect a dinner invitation.”

When Marlene Koenig, librarian at the Washington-Alexandria Architecture Center since 2008, made this prediction to the exiled Crown Prince Alexander II of Serbia in 1988 (he was an insurance executive in Arlington, Va., at the time) she was sure she would be proved right. And she was. In 2011, the government allowed Alexander to return to his homeland.

Grid Technologies

The dinner invitation was more of a surprise. But Koenig did, indeed, dine at the palace in Belgrade when, in 2005, she was invited to a celebration for Alexander’s 60th birthday. In 2010, she was invited back to celebrate the 25th wedding anniversary of Alexander and Crown Princess Katherine.

Koenig returned to Belgrade once again this past May with another invitation from the crown prince, this time to attend the state funeral of members of the deposed Yugoslavian royal family. Decades after their deaths in exile, Alexander succeeded in exhuming his parents, King Petar II Karadjordjevic and Queen Aleksandra; grandmother Queen Maria; and brother Prince Andrej from cemeteries in the United States, Britain, and Greece, and bringing them back to Serbia for reburial. Koenig stood with Alexander in the Oplenac royal chapel in the southwestern town of Topola, where Serbian government officials and hundreds of mourners attended the historical event.


Virginia Tech among nationally ranked universities in Grid Technologies Collaborative; group holds national conference in Arlington

The Grid Technologies Collaborative (GTC), an industry-university-government integrated research and development group launched in 2011 to advance the state-of-the-art in transmission and distribution system level power electronics technologies, met recently at the Virginia Tech Research Center — Arlington for its 2013 National Conference.

Grid Technologies

Representatives from Virginia Tech and four other nationally recognized universities -- Carnegie Mellon University, Pennsylvania State University, the University of Pittsburgh, and West Virginia University -- that form the U. S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory Regional University Alliance (NETL-RUA) were among more than 70 energy professionals in attendance at the conference.


Grad students travel to Scandinavia for first-hand look at global supply chain and operations

“Our last day in Helsinki we visited Fiskars and StoraEnso. With each new visit, I am more impressed with these companies. Each presentation is very informative and provides a new perspective on supply chain management.”

Mini Golf NBM

This is an entry on Meredith Barnard’s blog. Barnard is one of 21 graduate students who embarked on a Virginia Tech study abroad summer program, Products and Processes in Scandinavia, on June 21. Barbara Hoopes, an associate professor of business information technology who teaches in National Capital Region Pamplin College of Business MBA and Executive MBA programs, planned the two-week program (the students return on July 7) and is traveling with the group.


Science Diplomats Club visits Virginia Tech’s research center in Arlington for overview of university’s capabilities

The Science Diplomats Club, a group of science and technology representatives from research institutions and foreign embassies in Washington, D.C., gathered at the Virginia Tech Research Center — Arlington recently to learn about Virginia Tech’s capabilities in the National Capital Region. The Australia, Austria, China, Canada, Finland, France, Italy, Poland, Sweden, and The Netherlands embassies were among those represented.

Mini Golf NBM

The Science Diplomats Club, founded in 1965, is a dynamic two-way information and communications forum, benefiting not only its international members but also the science, technology, and higher education stakeholders in Greater Washington who wish to stay in touch with the international science community. The group organizes regular “Science Breakfasts” with leaders in science and technology and external activities to visit science centers or technology parks.


Landscape architecture students design and build ‘Tomorrow’s Water’
for indoor mini golf course at National Building Museum

Mini Golf NBM

A team from the Virginia Tech Washington Alexandria Architecture Center (WAAC) is once again part of the popular indoor Mini Golf exhibition at the Washington Building Museum. This summer’s expanded attraction features two nine-hole course options, with all new holes designed and built by leading Washington-area architects, landscape architects, and contractors.

The courses explore the architects’ and designers’ visions of “Building the Future,” with twists and turns to challenge golfers young and old. During museum hours, visitors can play a one-of-a-kind course, designed for ages four and up, in air-conditioned comfort until Labor Day (September 2, 2013).


Metropolitan Institute at Virginia Tech hosts Sir Robert Harvey, mayor of New Zealand’s first Eco-City, for series of sustainability meetings and presentations

Sir Robert Harvey (“Mayor Bob”), former mayor of Waitakere, New Zealand's first Eco City, was in the Washington, D.C., area last week to meet with government officials in Virginia and Maryland who are fostering sustainability in their communities and to give a lecture at the Artisphere in Arlington. For the past 25 years, Harvey has infused the diverse dimensions of sustainability throughout his work as an elected official, international peace envoy, president of the New Zealand Labour Party, and businessman. He currently serves as chairman of the Auckland Waterfront Authority, responsible for greening the waterfront by transforming inaccessible wharfs to inviting public spaces.

Harvey at Artisphere

Harvey’s visit was hosted by the Metropolitan Institute at Virginia Tech. “We are excited to have Mayor Bob back in Alexandria to share his wit and wisdom on sustainability leadership. His inspirational story of building the Waitakere Eco-City offers many lessons for policymakers and practitioners here in the U.S , said Joe Schilling, research assistant professor and interim director of the Metropolitan Institute. Harvey and Schilling have collaborated on several international sustainability exchanges starting with the Mayors Asia Pacific Environmental Summits in 1999 and 2001.


Washington Semester opens window to American policy process for 10 Virginia Tech undergrads

Every summer, a group of Virginia Tech undergraduates head to the nation’s capital for Washington Semester -- an open window to the American policy process. The 12-week program at the School of Public Administration and Policy in Old Town Alexandria combines an intensive schedule of coursework, internships, and field trips that revolve around U.S. democracy and governance.

Capital Street

The 2013 Washington Semester, open to students in all majors, began last week. Ten students are enrolled in the program: Amanda Anger, Brandon Barr, Simon Hallerman, Austin Harmon, Wanawsha Hawrami, Rachel Hurley, Amanda Lemons, Michael Niedzwiecki, Matt Saunders, and Jack Scher.

The students receive 12 hours of academic credit for the program. Nine of those credits are for five substantive course modules. This year’s theme is “Government and Crises” and each class module addresses a different dimension of this topic. Three additional credits are given for for a summer-long internship in a public agency or non-profit that is graded in conjunction with class participation.


High Table

Mark Sorensen honored with 2013 Outstanding Staff Award for exceptional service in the National Capital Region

Cited as someone whose “dedication to the enterprise has been invaluable” and whose “performance represents the best of Virginia Tech,” Mark Sorensen, systems specialist, National Capital Region Operations, has been recognized with the 2013 Outstanding Staff Award. Sorensen's nomination also noted his “compassion, diligence, and sense of humor with faculty, staff, and students…his friendly demeanor helps us feel less frazzled.

“IT in the NCR simply could not function as well as it does without the dedication and assistance of Mark Sorensen,” the nomination said.

The award presentation was made by Don Leo, vice president and executive director of National Capital Region Operations, during a staff appreciation luncheon held last week at Virginia Tech’s location in Old Town Alexandria. The award – which carries a $500 prize – was initiated in 2006 to recognize "consistent exceptional service to the university."


Giselle Datz presents paper at United Kingdom workshop on the power of finance before and after the great financial crisis of 2007-2008

High Table

Giselle Datz, an assistant professor in Virginia Tech’s Government and International Affairs program in the School of Public and International Affairs (SPIA), was among a group of leading academics from across the globe who presented papers at a recent workshop held in Sheffield, United Kingdom. The full day workshop explored The Power of Finance before and after the Great Financial Crisis, and was funded by the journal, Government and Opposition; the Centre for Research on Socio-Cultural Change (CRESC), at the University of Manchester, United Kingdom; and the Sheffield Political Economy Research Institute (SPERI) at Sheffield University.

The papers presented at the workshop will be collected into a special issue of Government and Opposition that will be published in 2014.


Melissa Maybury Lubin selected as student speaker for National Capital Region Commencement on May 19

High Table

Melissa Maybury Lubin, who received her Doctor of Philosophy in Adult Learning and Human Resource Development last month, will speak on “Celebrating in the Moment” at the 33rd National Capital Region Commencement on Sunday, May 19. Lubin was selected for this honor by the Commencement Speaker Committee. Each student who entered the competition to serve as student speaker at commencement was required to submit a copy of a three-minute speech which he/she later presented and discussed with the committee.

During the commencement ceremony, which begins at 1:30 p.m. at the Center for the Arts in Fairfax, Lubin will be hooded by her chairs, Marcie Boucouvalas, professor of human development in the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences at Virginia Tech in the National Capital Region and director of the Adult Learning and Human Resource Development Program, an option in the Department of Human Development; and Paul Renard, adjunct faculty.


Korean engineers on six month study program in the National Capital Region

A cohort of 10 South Korean engineers -- all of whom have had anywhere from two to 17 years of work experience – are participating in a six-month civil engineering program at the Virginia Tech Research Center – Arlington Sponsored by Virginia Tech’s Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Continuing and Professional Education and funded by the Korean Professional Engineering Association (KPEA) and the Korean-U.S. Science Cooperation Center (KUSCO), the program has been coined the VHigh TableT-KPEA Global Engineering Initiative.

Sponsored by Virginia Tech’s Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Continuing and Professional Education and funded by the Korean Professional Engineering Association (KPEA) and the Korean-U.S. Science Cooperation Center (KUSCO), the program has been coined the VT-KPEA Global Engineering Initiative.


National Capital Region faculty and doctoral students participate in celebrated High Table, a banquet for the mind

High Table

High Table, a greatly anticipated event held annually in Blacksburg, brings together faculty, students, alumni, and invited guests from the Center for Public Administration and Policy (CPAP) locations in Richmond, Alexandria, and Blacksburg, to celebrate the life of the mind .

A series of special events and presentations characterize the two-day event adopted by the center in 1986.

Organized in large part by the student organization Public Administrators of Virginia Tech, High Table is a celebration steeped in tradition. It is based on similar events held for centuries at Oxford and Cambridge Universities, where faculty and students would come together in ceremonious fashion to share a meal and listen to an honored faculty member speak on a topic of importance to his or her field.


Philip Spellerberg receives 2013 Staff Career Achievement Award
for his work at Occoquan Watershed Monitoring Lab

VT Strategic Plan

Philip Spellerberg of Manassas, Va., retired laboratory specialist in the Charles E. Via Jr. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering in the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech, has received the university's 2013 Staff Career Achievement Award.

Spellerberg retired from the university in 2012 after 30 years of service. He spent the duration of his career at the Occoquan Watershed Monitoring Laboratory in Manassas, the university’s first continuously operated research lab in the National Capital Region. He contributed to projects addressing the fundamental understanding of watershed processes, the management of water quality, and efforts to restore the Chesapeake Bay.


Professor Emeritus Jim Wolf to give 2013 Distinguished Lecture in National Capital Region on May 9

VT Strategic Plan

Jim Wolf, professor emeritus, Center for Public Administration and Policy, will give the 2013 Distinguished Lecture, entitled “Learning from Hurricane Sandy: Policy, Administrative and Technical Challenges to Metropolitan Governance,” on Thursday, May 9. The Distinguished Lecture Series, held annually on Virginia Tech’s traditional Reading Day, is sponsored by the National Capital Region Faculty Association. The lecture will begin at 4 p.m. in the Ballston Room on the second floor of the Virginia Tech Research Center — Arlington.

A member of the Virginia Tech community since 1978, Wolf led the effort to establish both a master’s and doctoral program for the Center for Public Administration and Policy in the National Capital Region. He subsequently served as program chair for the center, coordinating its work across the main campus and the National Capital Region. Wolf also held the position of acting director for the School of Public and International Affairs.


National Capital Region Hokies participate in The Big Event by lending
a hand to local community service projects

The Big Event at Virginia Tech began in Blacksburg in 2002 and has grown exponentially. Rooted in Virginia Tech's motto Ut Prosim (That I May Serve), The Big Event has provided an opportunity for the entire Virginia Tech community to join together and thank the university’s surrounding communities.

VT Strategic Plan

For a number of years, Hokies in the National Capital Region have supported a local version of The Big Event. Last Saturday, the National Capital Region Chapter of the Virginia Tech Alumni Association organized about 60 Hokies -- including alumni and graduate students -- to volunteer for multiple community service opportunities in the National Capital Region. These included three Habitat for Humanity of Northern Virginia sites (ReStores in Alexandria and Chantilly, and a home renovation project in Falls Church); Goodwill of Greater Washington’s store on Glebe Road in Arlington; and an invasive species removal project at Arlington County’s James W. Haley Park near Shirlington.


Virginia Tech research team helps Washington D.C. with strategy for redevelopment at St. Elizabeths

VT Strategic Plan

John Provo, director of Virginia Tech's Office of Economic Development; Margaret Cowell, assistant professor in the Urban Affairs and Planning program in the National Capital Region; and Heike Mayer, chair of Economic Geography at the University of Bern, Germany, have completed a study recommending redevelopment options for St. Elizabeths, a former mental health facility on 300 acres of land in southeast Washington, D.C. The research team worked with the District of Columbia Office of Planning in collaboration with the Office of the Deputy Mayor for Planning and Economic Development to develop a DC Innovation Strategy for St. Elizabeths. The project was funded by the Economic Development Administration to support the federal government’s plan to relocate and consolidate the Department
of Homeland Security on the west campus of St. Elizabeths.


Virginia Tech sponsors symposium offering inside look at new developments in embedded security

VT Strategic Plan

A recent Research Symposium on Embedded Security, organized by the Center for Embedded Systems for Critical Applications (CESCA) in the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech, offered a look at leading-edge research in the area of secure embedded systems.

About 25 designers and managers from industry, government organizations, academia, and research labs convened for the symposium at the Virginia Tech Research Center — Arlington to learn about current directions in research and development related to secure and embedded systems and to network with others who have similar interests. All sessions were also simulcast to Blacksburg.


Job hunters flock to 22nd Annual Job Fair sponsored by Virginia Tech National Capital Region alumni chapter

VT Strategic Plan

Accenture Federal Services, Nationwide Insurance, Volvo Group Trucks, Digital Sandbox, Inc., the U.S. Postal Service, and the Virginia Tech Applied Research Corporation were among a diverse group of 40 employers participating in the 22nd Annual Job Fair last week. The fair is sponsored annually by the National Capital Region Chapter of the Virginia Tech Alumni Association to raise money for academic scholarships. National Capital Region-area high school seniors who have been accepted at Virginia Tech and graduate students enrolled in National Capital Region programs are eligible to apply for these awards.


National Capital Region 2012-2018 Strategic Plan focuses on growth in infrastructure, educational opportunities, research innovation, and collaboration

In response to Virginia Tech’s “Plan for a New Horizon,” the National Capital Region has released its 2012-2018 Strategic Plan, building on Virginia Tech’s history and strengths in the region. The plan promotes innovative and efficient use of resources to ensure that the region can support all three pillars of the university: learning, discovery, and engagement.

To create the plan, Committee Chair Don Leo, vice president and executive director of National Capital Region Operations, formed a committee representing all significant operations units within the region. Each member was tasked with being the liaison between his/her organization and accurately representing the unit head.

“We wanted to ensure that we heard and considered a broad and diverse set of opinions as we wrote the plan,” Leo said. “And I am grateful for the time and effort that each committee member afforded the process.”

Serving on the committee were: Barbara Allen, director, Science and Technology in Society, representing the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences; Rosemary Blieszner, Alumni Distinguished Professor and associate dean, the Graduate School, representing the Graduate School; David Gerrard, professor and department head, Animal and Poultry Sciences, representing the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences; Parviz Ghandforoush, managing director and professor, MBA and VT-MIT program, representing the Pamplin College of Business, Kathleen Hancock, associate professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering, representing the National Capital Region Faculty Association; Anne Khademian, director, School for Public and International Affairs and professor, Center for Public Administration and Policy, representing College of Architecture and Urban Studies; Tim Long, professor and associate dean, representing the College of Science; Michael Mortimer, assistant professor, representing the College of Natural Resources and Environment; Hazhir Rahmandad, associate professor, Industrial and Systems Engineering, representing the College of Engineering; Nick Stone, deputy director of and representing National Capital Region Operations; William Pierson, hospital director, Veterinary Teaching Hospital, representing College of Veterinary Medicine; Elizabeth Tranter, chief of staff of and representing the Office of the Vice President for Research; and Kenneth Wong, interim associate dean of the Graduate School and director of the Northern Virginia Center.


Executive master of natural resources student awarded scholarship from Arab American Association of Engineers and Architects

The Arab American Association of Engineers and Architects in the capital area (Maryland, Virginia, and Washington, D.C.) has awarded a scholarship to Yasmina Raya of Fairfax, Va., a student in the Executive Master of Natural Resources program offered by the College of Natural Resources and Environment in the National Capital Region.

Ralph Buehler

The scholarship is presented to a student in the field of engineering, architecture, or information technology to promote these fields as worthy professions and to foster stronger ties between the association and the Arab American Community. Raya earned a B.S. in architecture from the University of Minnesota.

Working for an environmental design firm after graduation, Raya helped her clients meet LEED accreditation standards. “As a result,” she said, “an initial interest in sustainability issues just continued to grow. I realized that I wanted to devote my career to green initiatives and began searching for a graduate program in the Washington, D.C., area that could offer me the knowledge and experience I would need to fulfill my goal of providing management and leadership in this area.”


Derek Hyra appointed to four-year term on Alexandria Planning Commission

Derek Hyra, an associate professor in the Department of Urban Affairs and Planning in the National Capital Region, has been appointed by the Alexandria City Council to a four-year term on the city’s Planning Commission.

Ralph Buehler

The Alexandria Planning Commission is a seven-member decision making body that makes recommendations to City Council for special use permits, development special use permits, request for vacations of or encroachments on public right-of-way, rezonings, master plan amendments, zoning text amendments, and other requests. The Planning Commission has the authority to approve or deny requests for subdivision of land or development site plans. Members also represent the Planning Commission on other boards or commissions such as the Transportation Commission.

Hyra resides in the West End area of Alexandria and teaches at the Virginia Tech campus in Old Town Alexandria. His research focuses on inner city economic development, with an emphasis on globalization, housing policy, urban politics, and race. He is currently finishing a book that investigates the redevelopment of Washington, DC’s Shaw/U Street neighborhood.


Sen. John Warner visits with Hokies on the Hill in Arlington

Former U.S. Sen. John Warner, the second longest serving senator in the history of the Commonwealth of Virginia, shared personal experiences and insights from his 50 years of public service with nine undergraduate students at the Virginia Tech Research Center — Arlington last week.

Don Leo

The students are in Washington, D.C. this semester as participants in the Virginia Tech Hokies on the Hill program, now in its fourth year. From Monday to Thursday they work in offices on Capitol Hill where they do everything from conversing with constituents to drafting legislative memos to contributing research and analysis on major issues. On Fridays the students attend a Friday seminar which includes guest speakers like Warner; visits and tours with government officials; and seminars and discussions with Chris Yianilos, director of federal relations based in the National Capital Region, on topics like the budget deficit, health care reform, the interaction between Congress and the media, ethics and integrity in government service, and legislative strategy. Students earn a full semesters’ worth of academic credit for their participation in the Hokies on the Hill program.


Don Leo and Stan Hefta will help lead newly established Virginia research corporation to foster bioscience innovation and partnerships

Don Leo, vice president and executive director for Virginia Tech National Capital Region Operations, and Stan Hefta, director of Strategic Business Planning and Development for the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute, have joined the leadership team of the newly established Virginia Biosciences Health Research Corporation (VBHRC). Founded by Virginia Tech and four other state universities -- Eastern Virginia Medical School, George Mason University, University of Virginia, and Virginia Commonwealth University -- the 501c (3) corporation was formed to foster collaborative scientific research innovation and to provide a new program for public/private partnering with Virginia universities.

Don Leo

Leo will serve on the 13-member board of directors and Hefta, who had an active role in the formation of the corporation, will serve on the 11-member Project Management and Oversight Panel.

In announcing the Virginia Biosciences Health Research Corporation, Gov. Robert F. McDonnell said, “Bioscience is on the forefront right now, and R&D investments have a tremendous economic impact in total jobs and increased annual state tax revenue. The Virginia Biosciences Health Research Corporation is another great example of a public-private partnership that will bring companies in the life sciences industry in direct collaboration with leading universities to build on Virginia’s growing momentum in this booming sector.”


Mahmood Khan gives keynote at tourism conference on universal values and cultural diversity in the 21st Century

Mahmood Khan, a professor in the Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management in the Pamplin College of Business, was invited by the United Nations World Tourism Organization to serve as a keynote speaker at an international conference, “Universal Values and Cultural Diversity in the 21st Century: How Can Tourism Make a Difference.”

Mahmood Khan

Held in Yerevan, Armenia, the conference was hosted by the Ministry of Economy of the Republic of Armenia and co-organized with the United Nations World Tourism Organization. The goal of the event – drawing together high-profile international public and private sector representatives and distinguished experts -- was to mainstream into the common agenda how tourism can contribute to tolerance, respect, and mutual understanding to better promote universal values and cultural diversity in the 21st century.

At the conclusion and in the framework of the conference, leading Armenian tourism industry stakeholders signed the Private Sector Commitment to the United Nations World Tourism Organization Global Code of Ethics for Tourism.


Ralph Buehler’s ‘City Cycling’ finds way to Parliamentary session to ‘Get Britain Cycling’

The book “City Cycling” appears in a photo taken during a session in Great Britain’s House of Commons last week where a motion to “Get Britain Cycling” gained momentum, garnering 125 supportive signatures from members of Parliament. “City Cycling,” recently published by MIT Press, is coedited by Ralph Buehler, assistant professor in the School of Public and International Affairs, Virginia Tech National Capital Region, and John Pucher, professor in the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, Rutgers University.

Last week’s Parliamentary session is the first of six inquiries that will examine the barriers which are preventing more people from cycling in the United Kingdom, where cycling makes up only two percent of all journeys, compared to 27 percent in the Netherlands and 18 percent in Denmark. Some European towns have more than 50 percent of all journeys made by bike.

cycling logo

The Early Day Motion 679 on Jan. 23 stated, “That this House notes that cycling benefits public health, the economy, the environment and quality of life; further notes the strength of public and parliamentary support for The Times newspaper’s Cities fit for Cycling campaign, and its backing for an inquiry by the All Party Parliamentary Cycling Group on Getting Britain Cycling; further notes calls from national cycling organizations for a cycling action plan to increase cycling among people of all ages, abilities and backgrounds, and to reduce the actual and perceived risks of cycling, whether for day-to-day travel, outdoor recreation or sport; and calls on the Government to provide leadership, resources and Cabinet-level co-ordination across Government departments and external partners to produce and implement such a plan as part of our Olympic legacy, including measures to strengthen road traffic law and its enforcement, improve cycling conditions and perceptions of safety, integrate cycling with public transport, promote cycling through schools, colleges, workplaces, community organizations and beyond, and embed cycling into the heart of transport, planning and other relevant policies.”


Master Food Volunteers help expand Virginia Cooperative Extension’s reach; training will be held in National Capital Region in March

These folks love food, and they love telling others about food even more. They are Virginia Cooperative Extension’s Master Food Volunteers.

The corps of volunteers helps the Virginia Cooperative Extension -- the community’s local connection to Virginia's land-grant universities, Virginia Tech and Virginia State University -- reach more Virginians with up-to-date, research based knowledge on food preparation, nutrition, food safety, and physical activity. Opportunities for service include health fair displays, food demonstrations at farmers' markets, teaching food safety classes, teaching basic food preparation skills, writing articles for the media on nutrition on wellness, assisting Extension nutrition programs for youth and adults, and much more.

Tomatoes

The Virginia Cooperative Extension is currently recruiting volunteers in Arlington and Alexandria to participate in the Master Food Volunteer program, offering 24 hours of training over four days in March. There is no prior educational requirement for those interested in becoming a Master Food Volunteer. The training covers basic nutrition, meal planning, cooking techniques, food safety, and how to work with diverse audiences. A $70 fee covers training, materials, and supplies. A limited number of scholarships are being provided to Arlington residents thanks to a grant from Arlington County.


Veterans drawn to natural resources graduate program in National Capital Region

Saifure Rahman

Jason Barnwell started thinking about launching a new career after his National Guard deployment to southern Iraq. “I’ve been to the Garden of Eden, and I’ve seen what man has done to it...” began his application essay for the Center for Leadership in Global Sustainability’s Executive Master of Natural Resources program, located in the National Capital Region.

Between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, in what some believe was the biblical Garden of Eden, a vast marshland harbored rich farmland as well as hundreds of species of birds and fish. But the marshes were drained long before Barnwell arrived, devastating the ecosystem.


Virginia Tech works with Dominion Virginia Power to help DOE launch offshore wind industry in the U.S.

A Dominion Virginia Power-led team, which includes the Virginia Tech Advanced Research Institute (ARI), is one of seven selected by the Department of Energy (DOE) to receive $4 million in federal matching funds to undertake initial engineering, design, and permitting for an offshore wind turbine demonstration facility.

The DOE will select up to three teams out of the seven for an additional $47 million each for actual construction and demonstration.

Saifure Rahman

In its DOE application, Dominion proposed designing, developing, and demonstrating a grid-connected, 12-megawatt offshore wind facility consisting of two Alstom six-megawatt turbines mounted on innovative foundations. Twelve megawatts would provide enough electricity for 3,000 homes at peak demand. Dominion's primary location for the demonstration project is in federal waters about 22 miles off the coast of Virginia Beach, although, according to Dominion, the ultimate site will depend on detailed investigations.

Others on the Dominion team are: Alstom Power Inc., a wind turbine manufacturer and major supplier of equipment and services to the global power generation market; KBR, a global engineering, construction, and services firm with experience in offshore wind; the Commonwealth of Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals and Energy; the National Renewable Energy Laboratory; and Newport News Shipbuilding, a division of Huntington Ingalls Industries.


Sanjay Raman named an IEEE Fellow

Sanjay Raman, professor of electrical and computer engineering, has been named an IEEE Fellow for his leadership in adaptive microwave and millimeter-wave integrated circuits.

The IEEE Grade of Fellow, conferred by the Board of Directors, is a distinction reserved for select IEEE members whose extraordinary accomplishments in any of the IEEE fields of interest are deemed fitting of this prestigious grade elevation. The status of Fellow is bestowed upon less than one-tenth of one percent of the annual voting membership of IEEE.

Sanjay Raman

IEEE is the world's largest professional association dedicated to advancing technological innovation and excellence for the benefit of humanity. It has more than 400,000 members in over 160 countries. IEEE-USA advances the public good and promotes the careers and public policy interests of 210,000 engineering, computing and technology professionals who are U.S. members of IEEE.

Raman joined the Virginia Tech faculty in 1998 and has been on assignment to the Microsystems Technology Office of Defense Advance Research Projects Agency (DARPA) since 2007. As a program manager, he leads research on microsystem devices and material integration. At Virginia Tech, Raman is a member of the Multifunctional Integrated Circuits and Systems (MICS) and Wireless@VT research groups. He established the Wireless Microsystems Laboratory to study integrated microsystems connected to information infrastructure via wireless communications links.


Raman Kumar launches EMBA Lunch and Learn Series with discussion of Euro-Zone Crisis

Raman Kumar, the R. V. and A.F. Oliver Professor of Investment Management in Virginia Tech’s Department of Finance, recently helped launch the Lunch and Learn Series sponsored by the Pamplin College of Business Executive (EMBA) Program in the National Capital Region. The series was initiated to showcase the talents of Virginia Tech faculty and alumni,” said Maureen Hall, director of the EMBA Program. “When I arrived at Virginia Tech a few months ago, I contacted a number of alumni and found that Dr. Kumar’s name came up often in their praise of Virginia Tech. So it seemed fitting that he should inaugurate the quarterly series which is open to current students, alumni, and prospective students.” The Lunch and Learn Series schedule also allows time for networking,” Hall said.

Kumar, who is located in Blacksburg and has been at Virginia Tech for 28 years, began his presentation on “Euro-Zone Crisis: Causes, Solutions and Consequences” with a history of the Euro and some of the advantages of a common currency which include the elimination of transaction costs for converting currency, for exchange rate risk, and for hedging costs; increased trade; and improved economic growth.

Kumar

On the other side, however, there are some disadvantages, said Kumar. There is loss of sovereignty over monetary policy to react to business cycles of recession and inflation. “And with a common currency, currency devaluation is no longer an option for improving price competitiveness in trade with other countries in the Euro-Zone,” he said.


ALHRD alum returns to Virginia Tech with insights on higher education in South Africa

Johannes Mokoele

Johannes Matata Mokoele, senior director of Human Resources for Durban University of Technology in South Africa, returned to his alma mater, Virginia Tech, recently to give a presentation on “The State of Higher Education in South Africa – Implications for the Durban University of Technology (DUT).” Mokoele earned his Ph.D. in the Adult Learning and Human Resource Development (ALHRD) Program, an option in Human Resources offered in the National Capital Region.

The presentation at the Northern Virginia Center was part of a week-long “good will” tour to the Washington, D.C. area in which Mokoele met with African scholars at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars; Neal Chalofsky, director, Human Resources Development, The Graduate School of Education and Human Development, The George Washington University; Laverne Page, Library of Congress specialist on South Africa; and representatives of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) and the American Society for Training and Development (ASTD), both at their Alexandria, Va., headquarters.


Urban planning studio works with Arlington County to explore ways to evaluate public art

wave arbor

Twelve students from five countries and three different Virginia Tech programs joined in an urban design studio, “Exploring Evaluation for Public Art: Arlington County as Laboratory,” to analyze past studies on public art and then develop the most effective methodologies for two case studies: Four Mile Run Water Pollution Control Plant Fence Enhancement and Arlington County: Long Bridge Park Phase I.

The Arlington Water Pollution Control Plant Fence Enhancement is part of a larger design project intended to reflect the function of the plant and raise awareness of the Four Mile Run Watershed, its water quality, wild life, and biodiversity. The project also aims to create a learning environment and incorporate specific locations along the fence for informal environmental education for people of all ages. According to Arlington County, fence enhancement is an important way to create distinct destinations with unique forms and innovative materials that can serve as landmarks and gathering points for the local neighborhoods.


Virginia Tech convenes third international conference to explore community response to crisis and disaster

davos

The Center for Community Security and Resiliency (CCSR) convened its third annual Conference on Community Resilience in Davos, Switzerland. Cosponsored by the Metropolitan Institute at Virginia Tech, the conference was held immediately prior to the Global Risk Forum, the world largest meeting on risk assessment and consequences, also held in Davos. Both the CSSR and the Metropolitan Institute, whose emerging research is focused on resiliency in metropolitan regions, are located in the National Capital Region.


National Capital Region faculty among those to receive research support from Global Issues Initiative

Ariel Ahram

Ariel Ahram, assistant professor in the School of Public and International Affairs in the National Capitol Region, is among the Virginia Tech faculty whose research projects were chosen for funding from the Institute for Society, Culture and Environment Global Issues Initiative (GII) Research Support Program (RSP). Earlier this fall, the GII RSP extended a broad-based call for innovative research projects to enhance faculty scholarship in the social sciences and humanities directed toward global issues with significant implications for the United States. Proposals were welcomed from any and all departments, centers and programs at Virginia Tech. The four selected projects were announced by GII Director David Orden last week.


‘Hokies v Hoos’ local alumni chapters compete to support USO’s United Through Reading program; donate new children's books through November 24

books

For the second consecutive year, in the giving spirit of the holiday season, the National Capital Region (NCR) Chapter of the Virginia Tech Alumni Association is collecting new children’s books to support the USO United Through Reading program. This program allows deployed troops the opportunity to read a book to their children and virtually be there, even when they can’t be there in-person. It works like this: The USO collects books that service men and women read aloud while being recorded on DVD for their child. A DVD of the service member reading, along with the book, is mailed to the child and family back home. In this YouTube video, a deployed Dad, tells how important United Through Reading has been in keeping him connected to his young children.

Last year the NCR alumni chapter collected more than 200 new books; this year’s goal is 300. “And we’ve added a competitive twist -- trying to collect more books than the D.C. Wahoos,” said NCR Chapter Community Service Director Brent Blevins. “We have been looking for a way to engage the local University of Virginia alumni chapter in a friendly competition and this book collection for the USO seemed a great way to do that.” Donations will be accepted through Saturday, November 24, when Virginia Tech takes on UVA in Lane Stadium.


Landscape Architecture graduate program highly ranked by DesignIntelligence

Virginia Tech’s graduate program in Landscape Architecture has been ranked second in the annual DesignIntelligence survey of design education in the United States, the only published national college rankings focused exclusively on design. The Landscape Architecture program is offered both in Blacksburg and in the National Capital Region at Virginia Tech’s Washington Alexandria Architecture Center (WAAC) located in Old Town Alexandria.

land

The undergraduate program in Landscape Architecture, offered in Blacksburg, was also ranked second in the survey.

All results appear in "America's Best Architecture & Design Schools 2013," the biggest issue of DesignIntelligence published to date.

Rankings are based on survey responses from 392 professional practice organizations that were asked, “In your firm’s hiring experience in the past five years, which of the following schools are best preparing students for success in the profession?” The respondents were also queried about additional issues, such as how programs rate in teaching various skills. In addition to the school rankings by professionals, deans and chairs from 351 academic programs were surveyed; this data is presented separately from the practitioner rankings.


Virginia Tech Science and Technology in Society program takes active role in worldwide forum on biodiversity

Virginia Tech’s Department of Science and Technology in Society (STS) partnered recently with the Arizona State University Consortium for Science Policy Outcome (CSPO) and the National Academy of Sciences Koshland Science Museum to organize a Washington, D.C., site for the World Wide Views on Biodiversity forum. This global event, initiated by the Danish Ministry of the Environment with support from the Danish Board of Technology and oversight from the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) at the United Nations, brought together more than 3,000 citizens from 25 countries to deliberate potential solutions for the worldwide decline in biodiversity.

Lisa

The Danish Board of Technology recruited 34 partners to host forums around the world that would empower people to provide feedback to national and global policymakers at the United Nations. David Tomblin, adjunct faculty, STS, in the National Capital Region, Mahmud Farooque, associate director, CSPO, and Jeanne Troy, program officer at the Koshland Science Museum, served as site project managers in the D.C. area, organizing a gathering of more than 100 participants representing Washington D.C./Virginia/Maryland demographics. They were responsible for recruiting participants, recruiting and training moderators, generating interest from relevant policymakers, creating media buzz, and dealing with the logistics of bringing more than 100 people together at the Koshland Science Museum.


Students in urban affairs and planning receive award for mapping a walking tour of local historical African American community

The Virginia Chapter of the American Planning Association (VAPA) awarded its 2012 Student Planning Award to five Virginia Tech students in the Urban Affairs and Planning (UAP) master’s program in the National Capital Region during the organization’s annual conference. Martha Coello, Paola Reyes, Catherine Spoehr, Kate Webb, and Chris Winnike were recognized for their innovative urban design studio project, “Giving Voice: African American Walking Tour, Falls Church and Fairfax County.” The tour was developed for the Tinner Hill Heritage Foundation.

VAPA

The mapped walking tour, brochure, and script -- with capability for a future audio component – were designed by the students to enhance and publicize the heritage of the African American community in Falls Church and a section of neighboring Fairfax County, commonly referred to as Tinner Hill. To complete the project, the students analyzed existing Washington-area walking and audio tours, conducted oral histories with long-time residents, and gathered other research on the community.


Randy Murch lends expertise to biosecurity and forensics panels convened in Washington, D.C.

Randall “Randy” Murch, associate director for Research Program Development at Virginia Tech in the National Capital Region, recently lent his expertise on biosecurity and forensics at two Washington, D.C., forums. The first was a congressional briefing on “Forensics: Science Policies to Increase Confidence,” sponsored by the American Chemical Society (ACS) Science and the Congress Project and held at the Capitol Visitor Center.

Randall Murch

The ACS convened this panel discussion to educate and inform congressional staffers about the 2009 National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report, Strengthening Forensics Science in the United States: A Path Forward, and to highlight several key areas of the report that apply to forensic sciences and how they should be improved. Murch, who served on the study committee for the 2009 NAS report, discussed forensic science and policy aspects of forensic science applied to chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosive weapons. Other speakers were: Constantine Gatsonis, Brown University, who spoke about error and its sources; John Lentini, a leading fire science and fire investigations expert in private practice, who focused on areas for improvement in his fields; and Amy Mundorff, University of Tennessee-Knoxville, who addressed the state of forensic anthropology and areas of need and improvement.


Top government official tells doctoral students that applying for federal jobs will get easier; shares keys to successful career in public policy

John Berry had some good news for Virginia Tech students in Alexandria recently: the cumbersome, antiquated, and lengthy process of applying for a position in the federal government will be getting easier.

And he should know. Berry is director of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, responsible for recruiting, hiring, and setting benefits policies for 1.9 million federal civilian employees, a post he has held for the last four years.

John Berry

“We are getting the job description down from 75 to 80 pages to no more than five,” said Berry, while admitting that his personal goal is two pages. And he has backing from the top. Berry recounts that when he told President Barack Obama about the 75 to 80 page job description, “The president just looked at me and said, ‘John, I don’t even think my job would have an 80 page job description.’”

What followed was not only agreement from Obama to reduce the job description, but a presidential order to migrate from the more difficult Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities application system to an easier resume system within the next year and a half.


Students explore social dimensions of sustainability at the Virginia Tech Center for European Studies and Architecture

A group of 14 students headed to the Virginia Tech Center for European Studies and Architecture in Riva San Vitale, Switzerland, this past summer, enrolled in a four-week, six-credit course developed by the School of Public and International Affairs to review the concept of sustainable development in a comparative context and to explore the social dimensions of sustainability.

Riva San Vitale

"The Sustainable Europe program offers students the special opportunity to explore sustainable development in an international and comparative context. Through team teaching, collaboration between the University of Virginia and Virginia Tech, and a focus on the multiple disciplinary and professional connections required to develop a sustainability focus, the course models the collaborative processes that are the foundation of sustainability research, policy making, and implementation," said Anne Khademian, director of the School of Public and International Affairs.

Virginia Tech Associate Professor Derek Hyra, in the Department of Urban Affairs and Planning in the National Capital Region, and Ralph Hall, Assistant Professor in the Department of Urban Affairs and Planning in Blacksburg, coordinated with Frank Dukes, lecturer and director of the Institute for Environmental Negotiation at the University of Virginia, to design the course program organized around a sequence of three interrelated modules.


MBA student Bilal Ahsan wins ICHRIE case study award; papers from five Virginia Tech students accepted for publication

Bilal Ahsan, an MBA student from the Pamplin College of Business in the National Capital Region, has won a third place award for his case study, “Getting Friendly with the King,” in an international competition sponsored by Johnson & Wales University and the International Council on Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Education (ICHRIE). The announcement was made during an awards ceremony at ICHRIE’s annual convention held recently in Providence, R.I. Mahmood Khan, professor of Hospitality and Tourism Management at the Northern Virginia Center and second author on the winning study, accepted the award.

Dr. Khan

“Getting Friendly with the King” discusses the recent co-branding venture between Burger King and Friendly’s. At the suggestion of a Burger King franchisee, executives at Burger King and Friendly’s have decided to offer products from both franchises at a co-branded location in New Jersey. Recently out of bankruptcy, Friendly’s is attempting to revitalize itself, hoping to strengthen its brand name and increase sales by offering its products alongside Burger King.

Five students in Khan’s Restaurant Franchising course entered case studies in the competition. Marianna Sigala, assistant professor of business administration at the University of Aegean, Greece, and chair of the ICHRIE Johnson & Wales Case Study Competition and Publication Series, commended the quality of case studies submitted by Virginia Tech students. She said that all five submissions garnered outstanding commendations by referees during the blind review process and were selected for publication in a future issue of ICHRIE’s newly established electronic Journal of Hospitality & Tourism Cases.


Master of Natural Resources students benefit from grant to improve green infrastructure practice

Virginia Tech's Center for Leadership in Global Sustainability has received a $35,000 grant from the Dominion Foundation Higher Educational Partnership program. The grant will be used by students in the National Capital Region's Master of Natural Resources (MNR) program to improve green infrastructure through service learning projects and workshops.

People-Map

Green infrastructure is an approach to planning and development that conserves and enhances ecosystem services. Ranging from site-scale features such as rain gardens and green roofs to landscape-scale stream corridors and forest canopies, green infrastructure offers a cost-efficient way for local communities, cities, and metropolitan regions to address challenges such as stormwater management and urban cooling, while simultaneously improving livability and community economic development.

Grants from the Dominion Higher Educational Partnership program better align Dominion's work force needs with the company's support of higher education. The Dominion Foundation awards approximately $1 million in higher educational partnership grants throughout Virginia, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia and in targeted localities in New England, Maryland, and North Carolina to accredited institutions of higher education -- colleges and universities, community colleges, and vocational, technical, or trade schools -- and 501(c)(3) non-profit organizations.


Saifur Rahman honored with 2012 Meritorious Service Award from IEEE Power and Energy Society

The IEEE Power and Energy Society (PES) recently presented its 2012 Meritorious Service Award to Saifur Rahman, the Joseph R. Loring Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and director of the Virginia Tech Advanced Research Institute, for exceptional and sustained technical, administrative, and professional contributions to the society.

Saifur

Earlier this year, the IEEE-USA awarded Rahman its Divisional Professional Leadership Award in recognition of his outstanding leadership efforts in advancing the professional aims of the IEEE in the field of power and energy in the United States.

The IEEE is the world’s largest professional association dedicated to advancing technological innovation and excellence for the benefit of humanity. The association and its members inspire a global community through highly cited publications, conferences, technology standards, and professional and educational activities.

Rahman is the founding editor-in-chief of the IEEE Transactions on Sustainable Energy. He is the vice president for publications at the IEEE PES and a member-at-large of the IEEE-USA Energy Policy Committee. Currently he serves on the U.S. National Research Council Oversight Committee of the Partnerships for Enhanced Engagement in Research (PEER) program, run by USAID and NSF. He is a distinguished lecturer of the IEEE PES and has lectured on smart grid, energy efficient lighting solutions, renewable energy, demand response, distributed generation, and critical infrastructure protection topics in more than 30 countries on all six continents.


National Capital Region Operations accepting proposals to fund meetings at Arlington research center on resiliency, security, and sustainability

VTRC-A

The Office of the Vice President for the National Capital Region is soliciting proposals for meetings and events to be held in the executive briefing center at the Virginia Tech Research Center — Arlington (VTRC-A) to promote the long-range goals of the university in the disciplines of resiliency, security, and sustainability.

Don Leo, vice president and executive director, Virginia Tech National Capital Region Operations, said that this “Plan for a New Horizon” strongly emphasizes the need for research and innovation to meet the structured challenges associated with global interdependence and the needs and challenges of a data driven society. “The National Capital Region is ideally suited to meet these needs due to Virginia Tech’s strong presence in this growing metropolitan region, accessibility to industry partners, government sponsors, and community groups, and leading programs in resiliency, security, and sustainability,” Leo said.


Derek Hyra’s Shaw/U Street research featured in Summer 2012
Virginia Tech Research magazine

Shaw Street

What happens when upscale comes to the ’hood? D.C.’s Shaw/U Street neighborhood has a rich cultural history and has had devastating riots. It’s on its way up again. But will it be enriched or thinned out? Derek Hyra’s in-depth ethnographic investigation of the redevelopment of the Shaw/U Street neighborhood in the northwest section of Washington, D.C., is the subject of the cover story in the Summer 2012 issue of the Virginia Tech Research magazine.

Hyra’s interest in the dynamics that shape the circumstances in low-income African-American neighborhoods began when he was a high school student in Westchester County, N.Y. Selected to play for a Harlem basketball team based at Riverside Church in upper Manhattan, Hyra developed strong relationships with his mostly African-American teammates. The commonality was basketball and only when he learned that he was the only one among them who had scored over 700 (out of 1600) on the SATs did Hyra realize the great disparity between their lives and his own.

Virginia Tech celebrates 150 years of American land-grant universities

1862 was a bleak time in American history as the Civil War cast a long, dark shadow across the nation. President Abraham Lincoln understood the value of education and its importance in improving the quality of life for all the country’s citizens. With a sweep of his pen, Lincoln signed the Morrill Act which established the land-grant college system -- leading to the creation of Virginia Agricultural and Mechanical College, now Virginia Tech, on October 1, 1872. The college’s first student, William Addison Caldwell, walked 26 miles from his home in Craig County to the campus, becoming the first of 132 students to enroll.

150 year land grant

Virginia Tech is one of two land-grant institutions in the state. Although the act was signed 150 years ago, in 1862, Virginia was ineligible to participate before its re-admission to the Union in 1870. Many of the commonwealth’s colleges vied for the land-grant distinction until 1872 when the state legislature selected the Preston and Olin Institute in Blacksburg to be redesignated the Virginia Agricultural and Mechanical College. Ten years later, Virginia State University in Petersburg was founded as a historically black four-year institution of higher learning. First known as Virginia Normal and Collegiate Institute, it obtained land-grant status in the Morrill Act amendments of 1890.


VT-ARC opens new offices at Virginia Tech Research Center—Arlington

The Virginia Tech Applied Research Corporation (VT-ARC), a non-profit applied research corporation affiliated with Virginia Tech, has moved into new offices, occupying the entire seventh floor of the Virginia Tech Research Center—Arlington, at 900 N. Glebe Road. VT-ARC also has offices at the Corporate Research Center in Blacksburg, Va.

VT-ARC reception

VT-ARC was established by the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors in March 2010 to extend the impact of Virginia Tech's basic and scholarly research enterprise by identifying and solving complex problems commonly associated with applied research and development. Advances in technology, despite all its benefits, often strain the social, political, industrial, and economic foundations of the societies they were intended to help, generating a need to find effective and enduring solutions. VT-ARC mission areas are intelligence, cyber/information technology, defense and security, health, and energy applied research.


Four National Capital Region graduate students awarded scholarships by NCR Chapter of the Virginia Tech Alumni Association

The National Capital Region (NCR) Chapter of the Virginia Tech Alumni Association has awarded $4,000 scholarships to each of four graduate students in the region: Fenye Bao, a Ph.D. student in Computer Science and Applications, College of Engineering; Mary McAlevy, in the Master of Arts in Education (Counselor Education) Program, College of Education; John C. O'Byrne, a Ph.D. student in Public Administration and Policy, College of Architecture and Urban Planning; and James H. Stagge, a Ph.D. student in Civil Engineering, College of Engineering.

The NCR Chapter raises money for scholarships through a number of chapter sponsored activities throughout the year, most notably its annual job fair. The scholarship program, initiated more than a decade ago for undergraduates in the region who plan to attend Virginia Tech, was expanded in 2010 to include students enrolled in National Capital Region graduate programs.

Alum Association

Previous scholarships were awarded at $2,000 each. Virginia Tech President Charles W. Steger arranged for matching funds to increase the 2012-13 scholarships to $4,000.


Washington Alexandria Architecture Center has hand in designing and building mini-golf course for museum’s interactive exhibit

When the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C., decided to explore design of the built world with an unprecedented interactive exhibition -- an indoor miniature one-of-a-kind golf course -- it invited firms and individuals to sponsor, design, and construct a hole for the course with a building-related theme inspired by an actual building, bridge, landscape, or monument. Or they could opt for a completely fanciful one. Some of the leading architects, landscape architects, and contractors in the Washington, D.C., area responded and the 12-hole course located in one of the museum's air-conditioned galleries is now open to players, ages four and up, through Labor Day, September 3, 2012.

minigolf

Two of the holes feature work emanating from Virginia Tech's Washington Alexandria Architecture Center. Rebecca May of Alexandria, Va., and Luke Van Bellegham of Washington, D.C., recent graduates of the Master of Landscape Architecture (MLA) Program, and Seth Estep of Alexandria, a current student in the MLA program, designed and built the seventh hole in the museum's mini-golf course, "Take Back the Streets," sponsored by the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA). When the project was announced by the National Building Museum, Terry Poltrack, director of public relations and communications at ASLA, sought landscape architecture students who would be interested in participating and May, Van Bellegham and Estep responded affirmatively.


Joseph Schilling coauthors American Planning Association guide for cities in transition

Joseph Schilling, research assistant professor and associate director of the Metropolitan Institute at Virginia Tech and Brookings Institution Senior Fellow Alan Mallach have coauthored Cities in Transition: A Guide for Practicing Planners, published by the American Planning Association(APA). The two authors are presenting the report at the 2012 Virginia APA Conference this week in Wintergreen, Va.

Cities Transition

Cities in Transition, available through the APA bookstore, offers practicing planners a comprehensive menu of place-based strategies for addressing different dimensions of urban distress -- from the reclamation of vacant properties to rebuilding local government and civic capacity. Schilling and Mallach view cities in transition through a typology that includes older industrial, shrinking cities, fast growing boom-n-bust cities, declining first tier suburbs, and small, but growing gateway cities. All these cities, large and small, east and west, share similar challenges of trying to confront the convergence of many socioeconomic transitions.


CAUS gears up for 50th anniversary celebration with icon competition; registration deadline is September 1

Caus postcard

The year 2014 marks the 50th anniversary of the College of Architecture and Urban Studies (CAUS) at Virginia Tech. To promote and commemorate this milestone, the college is sponsoring a competition for an icon and poster design. Entrants must incorporate the icon in a poster measuring 20 inches by 20 inches that reflects the educational heritage and history of the college. The poster should have greater artistic merit and a wider audience than a mere event announcement.

Current CAUS students, faculty, staff, emeritus faculty, and alumni, either as individuals or in teams, are eligible to compete

The registration deadline was recently extended to September 1 and the submission deadline is September 3. Winners will be announced on October 2. First prize is $5,000; honorable mentions will receive $500. More details on registration and submitting an entry can be found on the competition website.


inFORM exhibit at Virginia Tech Research Center—Arlington

inForm


inFORM: a language for form, an exhibition designed and produced by Virginia Tech second year industrial design students is now on display at the Virginia Tech Research Center-Arlington. Industrial design faculty members Mitzi Vernon, Akshay Sharma, and Martha Sullivan worked with the students to create the exhibition. Before traveling to the National Capital Region, the exhibit was presented in the lobby of Cowgill Hall in Blacksburg, home to Virginia Tech's College of Architecture and Urban Studies.


Students from MARE Center get 'backstage pass' to sporthorse industry on German trip

Mecklenburg


Fourteen Virginia Tech undergraduate students in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences were given the equivalent of a "backstage pass" to the finest horses, stud farms, and equestrian events that Germany has to offer during a recent two-week tour of the German sporthorse industry. The trip was led by faculty from the Middleburg Agricultural Research and Extension (MARE) Center and facilitated through Virginia Tech’s long-lasting partnership with the International Sporthorse Registry and Oldenburg Registry of North America. German-based, it is the largest warmblood registry in North America.

"The registry's director, Dr. Christian Schacht, has been a great supporter of our program at Virginia Tech and works tirelessly to put together this program for our students," said Rebecca Splan , associate professor, Equine Science "This is the third time we've offered the trip which is planned every other year."


Derek Hyra elected to governing council of Community and Urban Sociology Section of the American Sociological Association

Hyra


Derek Hyra, associate professor,  Urban Affairs and Planning, College of Architecture and Urban Studies, was recently elected to a three-year term on the council of the Community and Urban Sociology Section of the American Sociological Association.

"The Community and Urban Sociology Section of the American Sociological Association has been one of my intellectual homes for over a decade and it is an honor to be elected to its governing council," Hyra said.

Founded in 1973, the Community and Urban Sociology Section of the American Sociological Association explores new social theory and develops empirical research on groups living, working, and communicating across geographical boundaries, including cities, suburbs, and rural areas, as well as electronic communities and other spaces. The section encourages sociological perspectives on urban policy and encourages the interchange of ideas through organized meetings and conferences, newsletters, publications, and other means deemed appropriate by the council.

With more than 600 members, the Community and Urban Sociology Section is one of the largest in the American Sociological Association and hosts several sessions at the annual meeting of the association.


Elizabeth Morton heads McLean Revitalization Corporation; working on underground utility project

Elizabeth Morton


Elizabeth Morton, professor-in-practice, Department of Urban Affairs and Planning, College of Architecture and Urban Studies, currently serves as president of the McLean Revitalization Corporation (MRC), an organization of residents, landowners, businesses, and civic organizations who have joined together to promote the revitalization of the McLean Community Business Center (CBC). “Our group is dedicated to supporting efforts that will enhance the business center’s appearance, make it a more pedestrian friendly center of community activity, and increase its economic vitality,” said Morton.

One of the core components of aesthetic and infrastructure improvements identified by the McLean Revitalization Corporation is the undergrounding of utility lines.  “The removal of unsightly overhead utility lines will not only improve the physical character of the CBC but also increase reliability of service,” Morton said.


Jim Bohland gives Distinguished Lecture in National Capital Region; sponsored by NCR Faculty Association

bohland

“Public Research Universities in the 21st Century:  Challenges, Conflicts, and Paradoxes” was the title of Jim Bohland’s Distinguished Lecture sponsored by the National Capital Region Faculty Association. Bohland, professor emeritus and retired vice president and executive director of National Capital Region Operations, focused on five interdependent challenges facing public institutions of higher learning: declining public financial support for higher education; public lack of confidence in traditional roles of higher education; rise of professionalism in college athletics; use of new technologies to create new models of teaching and learning; and successfully accommodating the demands for instrumentalism with the need to meet the historical mission of a “liberal” education.

Bohland said that there has been a downward trend in public financial support for higher education for the past 15 years, despite significant growth in student enrollments during the same time period; in some states, reductions in public support have been as high as 40 percent. “The primary impacts of these two trends are readily apparent – larger classes, stagnant salaries and wages, struggles to maintain or improve infrastructure for instruction and research, and greater reliance on student tuition and fees for universities’ revenues,” he said.


Ganchimeg Darambazar honored with 2012 Outstanding Staff Award in National Capital Region

Ganchimeg

Ganchimeg (Ganaa) Darambazar, program specialist, National Capital Region Operations, has been awarded the 2012 Outstanding Staff Award. The presentation was made by Don Leo, vice president and executive director of National Capital Region Operations, during a staff appreciation luncheon held last week at the Greene Turtle Grille, located in the lobby of the Virginia Tech Research Center —Arlington. The award – which carries a $500 prize – was initiated in 2006 to recognize "consistent exceptional service to the university."



Virginia Tech Hosts Second Annual Cyber Security Summit and Competition

cyber security

Virginia Tech hosted the second-annual cyber security summit and competition recently, attracting teams from Virginia Tech, the University of Maryland, the U.S. Naval Academy, James Madison University, and the Marshall Academy. The event was held at the Virginia Tech Research Center – Arlington.




LaShonia Michelle Murphy chosen student speaker for National Capital Region Commencement on May 13

LaShonia

LaShonia Michelle Murphy, of Fairfax, Va., has been selected student speaker for the Virginia Tech National Capital Region Commencement on Sunday, May 13. Murphy was chosen for this honor through a competition held by the Graduate School in the National Capital Region whereby students interested in giving three-minute closing remarks at graduation submit a curriculum vita or resume; a letter of recommendation from his/her thesis/dissertation chair, graduate coordinator or faculty advisor; and a typed draft of the proposed speech, which must be an original work. The selection process also consists of meeting with the Commencement Speaker Committee, at which time the proposed speech is presented and discussed.  



First cohort in Executive Master of Natural Resources works on sustainability plan with premiere China hotel

Natural Resources

The inaugural cohort of 20 students in the Virginia Tech Executive Master of Natural Resources (XMNR) in Leadership for Sustainability program is working with the Linden Centre, a boutique hotel in the Yunnan province of southwestern China, to build its capacity to provide leadership for sustainability in today’s global society. This spring, as part of a four-month International Residency course that includes 10 days of international travel, the students went to Dali City, China, to present the initial strategies from their research to the client. They also conducted field analysis for a final report that will be completed prior to graduating as the first 18-month cohort in the XMNR program on May 13.



Gensler wins Gold Award from interior design association for Virginia Tech Research Center - Arlington

Gensler Gold

Gensler was a big winner when the Mid-Atlantic Chapter of the International Interior Design Association (IIDA) handed out its 2012 Premiere Awards for design during a recent recognition ceremony. The firm won a Gold Award in the educational category for the interior design of the Virginia Tech Research Center – Arlington. The seven-story, 144,000 square foot, LEED-certified building, at 900 N. Glebe Road, Arlington, Va., is owned by the Virginia Tech Foundation. Gensler won two additional Gold Awards for the Delegation of the European Union and Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson LLP. The latter also won the firm a Pinnacle Award, the highest honor awarded by the IIDA.



NCR alumni chapter sponsors blood drive to mark 2012 Day of Remembrance

Blood drive

In remembrance of the 32 students and faculty who lost their lives on April 16, 2007, the National Capital Region Chapter of the Virginia Tech Alumni Association held its annual INOVA Blood Drive at the Northern Virginia Center (NVC) in Falls Church on the fifth anniversary of the campus tragedy.



National Capital Region graduate programs schedule information sessions for prospective students from April 17 to May 15

New Graduate Degree

Virginia Tech offers more than 45 graduate degree and certificate programs in the National Capital Region. Several of these graduate programs are holding information sessions over the next month to give prospective students an opportunity to learn more about the degrees that are offered in the region.



6.44kWp solar photovoltaic system now generating power at Virginia Tech Research Center – Arlington

Bosnia Remade

The Center for Energy and Global Environment (CEAGE), located at the Virginia Tech Research Center – Arlington, 900 N. Glebe Road, has completed installation of a solar photovoltaic system for the building. The system is intended for educational, research, and demonstration purposes and contributes to the LEED credentials of the 144,000 square foot, seven-story building, as well. The 6.44 kWp system has been online since February 23, feeding more than 1261 kWh of electricity to the building to date.



Gerard Toal receives Outstanding Research Award from Association of American Geographers for book on Bosnia

Bosnia Remade

Bosnia Remade: Ethnic Cleansing and its Reversal (Oxford University Press), a book co-authored by Gerard Toal, professor and director, Department of Government and International Affairs, and Carl T. Dahlman, associate professor at Miami University, Ohio, has won the 2012 Julian Minghi Outstanding Research Award from the Political Geography Specialty Group of the Association of American Geographers (AAG). The award is given to the author(s) of a journal article, book chapter, or book published during the previous calendar year that makes an innovative, original contribution to the conceptual and/or methodological embrace of political geography. Toal accepted the award from AAG President Audrey Kobayashi during the association’s annual conference in New York City recently.



Saifur Rahman participates in Congressional briefing on wind power
as renewable energy source

“In the U.S. market, the cost of wind power is going down; we may be missing out on this important opportunity if we ignore the demand flexibility,” said Saifur Rahman, Joseph R. Loring Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and director of the Virginia Tech Advanced Research Institute, during the first of three “The Road to the New Energy Economy” Congressional briefings on the science and technology required to achieve the nation’s energy goals.



Virginia Tech participates in water crisis research collaborative sponsored by Dutch government

For the past three years, the Virginia Tech Center for Community Security and Resilience has been part of a collaborative network of Dutch and American universities and institutes looking at lessons learned from Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and subsequent insights and research to determine how they might be applicable to flood risks in The Netherlands. US Water Crisis Research Network (NUWCReN), funded by the Dutch Ministry of Transport, Public Works and Water Management, includes three other U.S. university centers: The George Washington University Institute for Crisis, Disaster, and Risk Management, University of Colorado Natural Hazards Center, and the University of Delaware Disaster Research Center; and four Dutch research centers: Wageningen University, COT Institute for Safety and Crisis Management, TNO (Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research) and Deltares.



Director of Metropolitan Institute and UAP grad student will present papers at international geography of governance conference

Kevin Desouza, director of the Metropolitan Institute at Virginia Tech, and Lauren Bulka, a graduate student in the Urban Affairs and Planning program, will present papers at the International Geographic Union (IGU) Commission on Geography of Governance Annual Conference 2012. The conference will be held at the Institute of Geography and Spatial Planning at the University of Lisbon, Portugal, April 12 to 14.



NCR Alumni Chapter sponsors 21st Annual Job Fair on March 6 to benefit scholarship program

More than 60 employers representing a wide array of companies and organizations will participate in the 21st Annual Job Fair sponsored by the National Capital Region (NCR) Chapter of the Virginia Tech Alumni Association to raise money for scholarships. National Capital Region-area high school seniors who have been accepted at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg and graduate students enrolled in NCR programs are eligible for these awards. The fair will be held Tuesday, March 6, from 1 to 6 p.m. at the Northern Virginia Center, 7054 Haycock Road in Falls Church.



Virginia Tech’s Spotlight on Innovation focuses on Seong K. Mun

Virginia Tech’s web homepage this week sheds a limelight on the work of Seong K. Mun, founding director of the Arlington Innovation Center: Health Research (AIC:HR), a college-wide multidisciplinary research hub in Virginia Tech’s National Capital Region



Kevin Desouza, director of Metropolitan Institute, authors new book on intrapreneurship

Bridging academia and the corporate world, Kevin Desouza, director of the Metropolitan Institute at Virginia Tech, has written a recently published book looking at the critical role of ideas in the success of any new venture. Intrapreneurship, published by the University of Toronto Press, provides an engaging guide for managers and employees, as well as academics and staffers, on how to direct the flow of ideas and foster a culture of entrepreneurship within their existing structure.



Derek Hyra elected chair of the board of commissioners for the Alexandria Redevelopment and Housing Authority

Derek Hyra, associate professor in Virginia Tech’s Urban Affairs and Planning Program, has been elected to a one-year term as chair of the board of commissioners for the Alexandria Redevelopment and Housing Authority, a public agency that provides affordable housing in the City of Alexandria. Hyra, who lives and works in Alexandria, Va., has served as a commissioner of the Authority since 2009 and became vice chair in 2011



Matt Dull, Theresa Jefferson, and Jack Harrald featured in new issue of Virginia Tech Research magazine

Three professors in the National Capital Region are prominently featured in the newly published Winter 2012 Virginia Tech Research magazine

“Who’s running the country? The story of appointees as good servants and ghosts as spoilers” focuses on Matthew Dull, assistant professor with Virginia Tech's Center for Public Administration and Policy, who is working to fill the gaps in what we know about how our government works – and how sometimes it doesn't.



NAIOP Northern Virginia recognizes Virginia Tech Research Center at 900 North Glebe Road as best speculative office building


900 North Glebe Road, housing the Virginia Tech Research Center—Arlington, has received a 2011 Award of Excellence for Best Speculative Office Building (four stories and above) from NAIOP Northern Virginia. The NAIOP awards program honors excellence in buildings, transactions, interiors, marketing, and membership in the Northern Virginia real estate community. The building was developed by The JBG Companies of Chevy Chase, Md., and was designed by Cooper Carry Inc., a national design firm located in Alexandria, Va.



Alan Thornhill named first chief environmental officer at Bureau of Ocean Energy Management

Alan Thornhill

Alan Thornhill, an adjunct faculty member in the College of Natural Resources, National Capital Region, has been named the first ever chief environmental officer in the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM). The position, established as part of the U.S. Interior Department’s structural reform for offshore energy oversight, is designed to promote applied science in offshore energy and to ensure decision making is based on sound information and research. Thornhill most recently served as science advisor to BOEM’s director and was the leading author of the department’s scientific integrity policy.



NCR alumni chapter sponsors children's book drive in spirit of holiday giving

NCR alumni chapter children

In the giving spirit of the holiday season, the National Capital Region Chapter of the Virginia Tech Alumni Association is supporting the USO partnership with United Through Reading® which allows deployed troops the ability to read their kids a book and virtually be there, even when they can’t be there in-person. The chapter has agreed to collect and donate 500 new books on the USO list by Tuesday, December 20.

The USO sends these books to service members who are stationed away from home for the holidays. They read aloud while being recorded on DVD at a USO center located in airports, community locations, military medical facilities, and overseas bases. The DVDs and books are then mailed to their children back home. All recording equipment, books, packing and shipping materials are supplied by the USO.



Equine Medical Center marks 15th anniversary of Tuesday Talks lecture series aimed at educating horse owners

Kevin Desouza and Margaret Cowell

The 2011-12 schedule of Tuesday Talks sponsored by Virginia Tech’s Marion duPont Scott Equine Medical Center (EMC) begins on December 6, marking the 15th anniversary of the lecture series. The Tuesday Talks series is designed to provide horse owners and horse professionals with valuable insight and practical advice on a variety of equine health care topics and provides the EMC with an opportunity to highlight faculty expertise.



Architecture students visit Frank Lloyd Wright's widely acclaimed Fallingwater during WAAC's annual tour

Kevin Desouza and Margaret Cowell

“Fantastic.” “Awesome.” “Amazing.” “The most beautiful thing I’ve ever seen.” “Much more spectacular in person than in photographs.”

These are some of the comments from Virginia Tech architecture students having just experienced a two-hour in-depth tour of Frank Lloyd Wright’s most widely acclaimed work, Fallingwater, in Mill Run, Pa. Their praise affirms Fallingwater’s stature as what Henry Hollander, coordinator for Outreach and Alumni Relations, Washington Alexandria Architecture Center (WAAC), describes as “the Holy Grail for architecture students.”



Kevin Desouza and Margaret Cowell awarded grant to study resilience
of citizen engagement to local disasters

National Capital Region graduate programs


Kevin Desouza, director of the Metropolitan Institute at Virginia Tech, and Margaret Cowell, assistant professor in Urban Affairs and Planning, have been awarded a seed grant of $20,000 from the Virginia Tech Institute for Society, Culture and Environment (ISCE) for their research project entitled Resilience of Citizen Engagement to Local Disasters: Studying the Emergence and Dissolution of Community Networks.



National Capital Region graduate programs schedule information sessions for prospective students, November 5 through December 6

National Capital Region graduate programs


Over the next few weeks, a number of graduate programs are providing opportunities for prospective students to learn more about degrees offered by Virginia Tech in the National Capital Region.

The Master of Landscape Architecture Program (MLA) is an accredited three-year professional degree designed for individuals who have completed the bachelor's degree in a field other than landscape architecture. The program offers a studio-based curriculum integrating design, ecology, fabrication, and representation. Emphasis is given to developing mastery of design through a series of design studios that investigate a range of landscape scales from sites to regions. The program seeks applicants whose academic and professional interests focus on the civic landscape.



Kris Wernstedt and Patrick Roberts awarded NSF grant to study use
of climate science in rural America flood planning and management

Kris Wernstedt and Patrick Roberts awarded NSF grant


Kris Wernstedt, associate professor, Urban Affairs and Planning, and Patrick Roberts, assistant professor, Center for Public Administration and Policy, in the National Capital Region were recently awarded a grant in a National Science Foundation and U.S. Department of Agriculture competition to fund a three-year project, Emergency Management in Rural America: Decision-Makers’ Use of Climate Science in Flood Planning and Management. The project will examine the obstacles to and opportunities for the use of seasonal climate forecasts in flood planning and management in rural areas of the United States.



Virginia Tech Hume Center and L-3 Communications partner
in cybersecurity research

Virginia Tech Hume Center


L-3 Communications has announced a cooperative partnership in cybersecurity research and development with Virginia Tech’s Ted and Karyn Hume Center for National Security and Technology. A key element of this relationship will be the establishment of L-3’s Cybersecurity Solutions Center in the Virginia Tech Research Center – Arlington, where the Hume Center has its cybersecurity innovations lab. L-3’s STRATIS division, an industry leader in cyber, intelligence and IT service and solutions, will lead this effort.



Saifur Rahman in documentary that helps public understand wind power

Saifur Rahman in documentary aimed at helping public understand wind power


Saifur Rahman, Joseph R. Loring Professor of Engineering, and director, Virginia Tech Advanced Research Institute (ARI), is among technical and public policy experts featured in a documentary that helps educate the public on wind power, the leader in the renewable electricity sector worldwide. Produced by the IEEE Future Directions Group, the hour-long Winds of Change aired on public television last April and is now available for viewing, in its entirety, on ieee.TV.



Fred Krimgold makes presentation at DHS resiliency workshop; addresses climate change on Swiss Embassy panel

Fred Krimgold makes presentation at DHS


Fred Krimgold, director, Disaster Risk Reduction Program, Advanced Research Institute, spoke at a recent workshop, "Resiliency of the National Building Inventory: Creating a Roadmap for the Future," sponsored by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate, Infrastructure and Geophysical Division.



Eric McCollum publishes book Couples Therapy for Domestic Violence: Finding Safe Solutions

Washington Semester program


Eric E. McCollum, professor in Human Development and director of the Marriage and Family Therapy program, has coauthored the book, Couples Therapy for Domestic Violence: Finding Safe Solutions, recently published by the American Psychological Association. In the book, McCollum; Sandra M. Stith, director of the Marriage and Family Therapy program at Kansas State University; and the late Karen H. Rosen, professor emeritus, Virginia Tech, report on the work and research they did in the Marriage and Family Therapy program at the Northern Virginia Center in Falls Church to develop and test a new model for helping couples who have experienced domestic violence and wish to end the violence and remain together.



Second Conference on Community Resiliency held in National Capital Region

Washington Semester program


The Second Conference on Community Resiliency -- Technology, Policy, and Resiliency:  Moving Resiliency from Concept to Reality -- was held earlier this week at the Virginia Tech Research Center – Arlington.  Organized by the Center for Community Security and Resilience in the National Capital Region, the meeting was a follow up to the first conference held at the Swiss Re Centre for Global Dialogue in Zurich, Switzerland, last October.



Washington Semester program combines theory and practice to offer
VT students quality internship experience

Washington Semester program


Washington, D.C. was home this summer to 12 undergraduates who participated in Virginia Tech’s Washington Semester, a 12-week program providing them with an opportunity to acquire professional experience in a governmental agency or other relevant enterprise in the private or nonprofit sector.



Mahmood Khan wins award from International Council on Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Educators

Students garner insights into sustainable development and innovation


Mahmood Khan, professor, Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management, Pamplin College of Business, was a winner of the 2011 International Council on Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Educators (ICHRIE) Johnson & Wales Case Study Competition for “Where is the Beef? A Case Study of Taco Bell.” Khan made the presentation at the organization’s recent annual meeting in Denver, Co., , and accepted his award at a special ceremony.



NCR Chapter of Virginia Tech Alumni Association awards
2011-12 scholarships to Yinan Li and Chris Winnike

Students garner insights into sustainable development and innovation


Two Virginia Tech graduate students, Yinan Li and Christopher (Chris) Winnike, have each been awarded academic scholarships in the amount of $2,000 by the National Capital Region (NCR) Chapter of the Virginia Tech Alumni Association.



Students garner insights into sustainable development and innovation during summer program at the Virginia Tech Center for European Studies and Architecture

Students garner insights into sustainable development and innovation


Sustainable Europe, a four-week, six-credit program designed around a sequence of three interrelated modules, brought 21 students from Virginia Tech and the University of Virginia to the Virginia Tech Center for European Studies and Architecture in Riva San Vitale, Switzerland, this past summer. The course was designed to contrast trends, planning, and policies in sustainability, sustainable urban development, and sustainable urban transport in Europe and the United States.



Jaan Holt led design competition for Martin Luther King, Jr. memorial in Washington D.C.

Virginia Tech firmly planted in National Capital Region

The dedication of the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial on Sunday, August 28, holds special significance for Jaan Holt, the Patrick and Nancy Lathrop Professor of Architecture in the College Architecture and Urban Studies at Virginia Tech, and the director of the Washington Alexandria Architecture Center in the National Capital Region.  Holt led the design competition for Washington D.C.’s newest memorial.



Executive MBA students travel to Turkey and Ireland for 10-day summer residency program

Virginia Tech firmly planted in National Capital Region

A group of 18 Executive MBA (EMBA) students in the Great Falls Cohort visited Turkey and Ireland during a 10-day international residency trip this summer. In Istanbul, Turkey, the group visited U.S. Commercial Services, Deloitte, Istanbul Stock Exchange, AMCHAM, and Seker Securities, where Charles Jacobina, director of the EMBA program in Pamplin College of Business, was interviewed by Bloomberg TV about the purpose of the students’ trip to Turkey, the current state of European debt crisis, and the role that Turkey plays in the world economy.



Virginia Tech firmly planted in National Capital Region with graduate programs and research facilities

Virginia Tech firmly planted in National Capital Region

With humble beginnings in a Reston farmhouse, which served as a graduate center in 1969, Virginia Tech is now firmly planted in the National Capital Region with teaching locations in Falls Church and Old Town Alexandria.



Seong K. Mun featured in College of Science Magazine
as 'scientist, scholar, and visionary'

Mun featured in College of Scicence Magazine

Seong K. Mun, founding director of the Arlington Innovation Center: Health Research (AIC: HR), is prominently featured as “scientist, scholar, and visionary” in the most recent issue of College of Science Magazine.



Equine Medical Center takes specially designed horse ambulance
to Civil War reenactment at Manassas/Bull Run

Meet the Scientists

More than 350 horses are traveling to northern Virginia from states that include Florida, Georgia, Massachusetts, New York, and Tennessee for the 150th Anniversary of The First Battle of Manassas/Bull Run, Prince William County, July 21 to 24. During a reenactment, on July 23 and 24, of this first major land battle of the Civil War, a medical horse ambulance and three-person crew from Virginia Tech’s Marion duPont Scott Equine Medical Center (EMC) in Leesburg, Va., will be on site to offer emergency care and transport services to any horse needing medical attention. Made possible by private donations from generous clientele and members of the equine community, the EMC ambulance is the only vehicle of its kind in Virginia. During the spring and fall seasons, the ambulance provides service to horses that incur injuries in steeplechase and point-to-point events throughout the Mid-Atlantic region.



Greater Washington, D.C., scientists gather at Virginia Tech’s new research center in Arlington to explore university’s research capabilities

Meet the Scientists

More than150 members of the scientific community in the greater Washington, D.C., area gathered at the conference center in the new Virginia Tech Research Center—Arlington recently for Meet the Scientists, an event organized in the National Capital Region to maximize the opportunities for networking among scientists and to provide a forum for sharing Virginia Tech's research capabilities at the new research center in the National Capital Region, in Roanoke, and in Blacksburg. Virginia Secretary of Technology Jim Duffey opened the half-day event at the center a week before its official opening.



Susan Piedmont-Palladino participates in Intelligent Cities Initiative forum at National Building Museum; Virginia Tech wins 24-Hour City beta competition in conjunction with event

Denmark Speaker

As part of its year-long Intelligent Cities Initiative, the National Building Museum, Washington D.C., recently convened a day long forum with experts from across the country to explore the evolving, deep-rooted connections between technology and ever expanding cities -- from education and energy to government, public health, and transportation. Planners, policy makers, tech professionals, and academics gathered to share ideas about using technology to make cities better places to live and work. Susan Piedmont-Palladino, a professor of architecture at the Virginia Tech Washington Alexandria Architecture Center (WAAC), has been senior curator for architecture and design at the museum since 2006 and was instrumental in launching the initiative in partnership with TIME, supported by IBM, and funded by the Rockefeller Foundation.



Barbara Hoopes takes 22 MBA students on study abroad tour in Scandinavia

Denmark Speaker

A group of 22 MBA students are currently engaged in a two-week study abroad tour in Finland, Sweden, and Denmark to learn about global supply chain issues. They are visiting multinational companies – including Stora Enso and Marimekko in Finland; Danaher Motion/Kollmorgen, IKEA, Volvo Truck, Volvo Car and Tetra Pak in Sweden; and Lego Company, Vestas, Maersk/Damco and Carlsberg in Denmark – to observe and learn about production, distribution, and supply processes. Barbara Hoopes, an associate professor of business information technology who teaches in the MBA and Executive MBA programs, Pamplin College of Business, in the National Capital Region planned the tour and is accompanying the students.



Grad student Guoqiang Yu wins 2011 Blackwell Award for best ECE research paper

oqiangyu

Guoqiang Yu has been named winner of the Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) department's 2011 Blackwell Award for the best research paper by a graduate student. Students are nominated by faculty members and the award winner is selected from among the nominees by the ECE department's graduate committee.



David Orden presents overview of findings in his new book at IFPRI seminar on 'Agricultural Support in Doha and Beyond'

Jan Carnogursky

David Orden, professor and director, Virginia Tech Global Issues Initiative (GII), Institute for Society, Culture and Environment (ISCE), was among the presenters at an International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) policy seminar, “Agricultural Support in Doha and Beyond,” held recently in Washington, D.C. Over 100 people attended the event, and a video of the entire seminar is posted by IFPRI on You Tube video.



Bruce Lawlor meets former Slovakian prime minister at international forum

Jan Carnogursky

Bruce Lawlor, director of the Virginia Tech Center for Technology, Security, and Policy had the opportunity to meet recently with former Slovakian Prime Minister Jan Carnogursky during a Prague Society for International Cooperation forum, "Transparency, Security and the Role of the United States Overseas." Held at Syracuse University's Maxwell School of International Relations, the discussion focused on NATO's implementation of United Nations Security Council Resolution 10200 to protect Libyan civilians from the administration of Colonel Muammar Qaddafi.



Barbara Angelotti receives 2011 Outstanding Staff Award in National Capital Region

Barbara Angelotti

Barbara Angelotti, office manager, Occoquan Laboratory, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, was awarded the 2011 Outstanding Staff Award during last week's staff appreciation luncheon, the first event held at the new Virginia Tech Research Center – Arlington. Jim Bohland, vice president and executive director, National Capital Region Operations, presented Angelotti with the sixth annual award – which carries a $500 prize – in recognition of "consistent exceptional service to the university." Charmaine Carter, assistant to the MBA director, Business Administration Program, and Myriam Lechuga, administrative assistant, School of Public and International Affairs, were honored with plaques as nominees for the award. (Lechuga was unable to attend.)



WAAC students honored by state society and local chapter of American Institute of Architects

Photo Siim Tiisvelt

Siim Tiisvelt from the Virginia Tech Washington Alexandria Architecture Center (WAAC) has won the 2011 Virginia Society American Institute of Architects (AIA) Prize Competition, sponsored by The Whiting-Turner Contracting Co. and open to students at Virginia's architecture schools. Each entry was required to be the work of one individual; no collaborative projects were allowed. Tiisvelt is an undergraduate consortium student from the Estonia Academy of Arts in Tallin.



Kelly Roder is curator for exhibit space at Northern Virginia Center to showcase library resources

Exhibit 2

Historical events of April 1861 and April 1865, including the battle at Fort Sumter which started the Civil War; Virginia's secession from the Union; General Robert E. Lee's surrender at Appomattox; and the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln are all part of the current exhibit in the University Library Resource Center located on the first floor of the Northern Virginia Center (NVC) in Falls Church.



John Harrald appointed to serve on newly formed National Mass Care Council to develop and promote national strategy

rrald

John Harrald, research faculty at the Virginia Tech Center for Technology, Security, and Policy in the National Capital Region, has been appointed to the newly formed National Mass Care Council (NMCC). The council, co-led by the American Red Cross, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and the National Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (VOAD), will serve as the steering body for the development and promotion of a National Mass Care Strategy.



Beth S. Offenbacker, Center for Public Administration and Policy, chosen student speaker for May 15 National Capital Region Commencement

fenbacker 041411

Beth S. Offenbacker, of Arlington, Va., has been selected student speaker for the Virginia Tech National Capital Region Commencement ceremony on Sunday, May 15.  Offenbacher earned a Ph.D. in public administration/public affairs, Center for Public Administration and Policy (CPAP), in July 2010 and will walk at Spring Commencement.



Barbara Hoopes honored with Warren Holtzman Outstanding Educator Award and University Certificate of Teaching Excellence

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Barbara J. Hoopes, associate professor, Department of Business Information Technology, Pamplin College of Business, National Capital Region, has been awarded the Warren Holtzman Outstanding Educator Award. The announcement was made by Richard Sorensen, dean of Pamplin College.



Virginia Tech Applied Research Corporation networks to foster research with New River Valley tech and science community

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Tom McNamara, president and chief executive officer of the newly established Virginia Tech Applied Research Corporation (VT-ARC), and Key Watkins, chief of staff, were recently introduced to some 100 faculty, staff, and members of the research community from across the New River Valley technology corridor, during a reception and networking event in Blacksburg.



EMBA cohort visits high-growth companies during 10-day residency in South America

IMG 0287 1

A 10-day international residency trip, a requirement of Virginia Tech's Executive MBA (EMBA) 18-month program, took 19 students in the Skyline Cohort to high-growth companies in Santiago, Chile, and Buenos Aires, Argentina. In Santiago, the group visited Invest Chile, Adexus, Gechs, Suika, the U.S. Embassy Commercial Services, Enersis, 3M and the De Martino Winery. In Buenos Aires, they visited Globant, Three Pillar Group, and Deloitte. The EMBA has taken previous cohorts to China, Vietnam, Brazil, Russia, Scotland, Finland, Ireland, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, Hungary, Germany, Czech Republic, and Austria.



Students in urban affairs and planning studio work with Tinner Hill Heritage Foundation to preserve African American history in Falls Church

TinnerHillMarch26 10 017

Long time African-American residents of Falls Church gathered last week at a local community center to share memories, photographs, and documents at "Telling Our Story," an event cosponsored by the Tinner Hill Heritage Foundation, Virginia Tech's Urban Affairs and Planning (UAP) program in the National Capital Region, and George Mason University as a way to share and preserve the rich history of the community.



Landscape architecture students build nest for outdoor exhibit at the Torpedo Factory Art Center in Old Town Alexandria, April 9 through May 15

Nest 1

Laurel McSherry, professor and director of the Master of Landscape Architecture program, and 11 of her graduate students in the National Capital Region are working on one of twelve artist-created nests installed behind the Torpedo Factory Art Center and along the waterfront of the Potomac River in Old Town Alexandria. The outdoor exhibit will run from Saturday, April 9 through Sunday, May 15, 2011.



Deadline approaching for ‘32 for 32' initiative for April 16th remembrance; log community service and upload photos at VT-ENGAGE

M engagelogo jpg

The "32 for 32" initiative created by the April 16th Student Planning Committee to encourage remembrance throughout the year of the individuals who were lost on April 16, 2007 is drawing to a close. But there is still time to log "32 for 32" service hours on the VT-ENGAGE website. Virginia Tech National Capital Region students, faculty, staff, alumni, and friends are urged to record their 32 hours of service through VT-ENGAGE by April 16, 2011. Any hours served from July 2010 can be recorded; this includes time spent on volunteer projects through campus, community, church, and school organizations.



ECE professors contribute to chapter in Encyclopaedia of Sports Medicine

Run

Grant A. Dove Professor Yue (Joseph) Wang and Jianhua (Jason) Xuan, associate professor, Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, contributed to the chapter on "Bioinformatics and Public Access Resources" in Genetic and Molecular Aspects of Sports Performance, the recently published 18th volume of the Encyclopaedia of Sports Medicine from the Medical Commission of the International Olympic Committee.



Economist David Orden discusses commodity price spikes on NPR's The Diane Rehm Show

David Orden

David Orden, director of the Global Issues Initiative (GII), Institute for Society, Culture and Environment (ISCE), was invited to join a panel of experts on NPR's The Diane Rehm Show February 16 for a discussion on "Commodity Price Spikes." Other guests were Bob Zoellick, president of The World Bank and former deputy secretary, U.S. Department of State; Zanny Minton Beddoes, economics editor, The Economist; and David Leonhard, a columnist at The New York Times.



Alumni sponsor 20th annual job fair in National Capital Region on March 8 to raise money for scholarships; NCR grad students among those to benefit

job fair 2010 009

The National Capital Region (NCR) Chapter of the Virginia Tech Alumni Association will sponsor its 20th Annual Job Fair on Tuesday, March 8, from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Northern Virginia Center in Falls Church to raise money for scholarships. NCR-area high school seniors who have been accepted at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg and graduate students enrolled in the National Capital Region will benefit from this effort.



WAAC expands its urban footprint in Old Town Alexandria

DSC 0019

In January, the Washington Alexandria Architecture Center (WAAC) expanded its footprint in Old Town, leasing a corner property one block east of its main building on Prince Street. The new property – 901 Prince – includes studio, seminar, and office space for National Capital Region faculty and students in landscape architecture and architecture. Formerly a Studebaker showroom and garage, 901 Prince was renovated into a two-floor office building in 1981. With numerous windows overlooking Prince and S. Alfred Streets, the new first-floor space (about 5000 square feet) "enables students and faculty to become part of the urban fabric," said Laurel McSherry, director of the Landscape Architecture Program.



Megabus.com expands Washington D.C. service to Christiansburg/Blacksburg/Roanoke with tickets low as $1; free seat giveaway through March 1

p1010071 150x150

Virginia Tech faculty, students, and employees in the National Capital Region can now travel by megabus.com to Christiansburg/Blacksburg/Roanoke for as low as $1. Megabus.com, a city-to-city, express bus company recently added this route to its service in nearly 50 cities. In addition to low fares, megabus.com offers customers environmentally-friendly buses, free Wi-Fi, power outlets, and restrooms. Through March 1, megabus.com is offering 200,000 free seats to passengers through its Winter Giveaway promotion. The promotion code for this offer is WOW200K.



National Capital Region Hokies garner four awards from Virginia Tech Alumni Association

logo

The National Capital Region (NCR) Chapter has garnered four 2010 awards from the Virginia Tech Alumni Association: Outstanding Community Service Project, Outstanding Chapter Officer Award, Outstanding Chapter Scrapbook, and Outstanding Chapter Award.



College of Natural Resources and Environment offers spring program to preserve nature and culture in China; application deadline March 1

inaPhoto1

As part of its China Sustainability Initiative (CSI), a series of professional development programs and client services focusing on leadership for sustainability, the College of Natural Resources and Environment is offering a 12-day program in South China, May 17 through 28, 2011. The trip to the Guangxi Province of South China is designed for graduate students, senior undergraduates, alumni interested in lifelong and service learning, and professionals seeking international work experience. Participants work as a professional consulting team to conduct a project and produce a report on the opportunities and constraints for sustainable development in the region. Michael Mortimer, director of the Natural Resources and Environment program, National Capital Region, and David Robertson, associate director, will lead the program in South China, which requires pre- and post-trip work. Application deadline is March 1.



Saifur Rahman one of six experts invited to speak at colloquium
on 'New Technology and Alternative Energy' in Bangladesh

nkeeper

Saifur Rahman, Joseph R. Loring Professor of Engineering, and director, Virginia Tech Advanced Research Institute (ARI), was among six international experts invited to speak at “The Daily Star Leadership Colloquium” in Bangladesh earlier this month. The Daily Star, founded in January 1991, is the largest circulation English daily newspaper in Bangladesh. The publication inaugurated the colloquium, “New Technology and Alternative Energy,” this year as a unique platform for a comprehensive dialogue on the extraordinary challenge Bangladesh faces in its energy sector and the opportunity the challenge accords to move the country forward. Major government, industry, academia, resident, and expatriate Bangladeshi stakeholders joined together to discuss new ideas in the energy sector and practical innovative solutions to the country’s energy crisis. A major goal of the colloquium, which covered issues that included fuel cell technology, biomass, wind, and solar energy, and conventional energy developments, is that the dialogue will help government address short- and long-term energy needs of the country.



Randall Larsen featured speaker at CPAP Roundtable on Leadership
and Administration

AP roundtable

The Center for Public Administration and Policy (CPAP) recently hosted its annual Fall Roundtable on Leadership and Administration. Featured guest was Colonel Randall Larsen, USAF (Ret.), founding director, Institute for Homeland Security and chief executive officer for the non-profit research organization the WMD Center. Colonel Larsen addressed the threat of bioterrorism and the failure of government to implement essential preventive and preparedness measures for a potential WMD attack. Bruce Lawlor, director, Virginia Tech Center for Technology, Security, and Policy, and professor of practice with CPAP, served as faculty moderator for the roundtable.



Secretariat's son Innkeeper joins MARE Center stallion roster

nkeeper

Triple-crown victor Secretariat, who continues to win hearts as the hero of a popular Disney film released last summer, is inspiring a new generation of fans and continuing to influence equestrian sport through his descendants. One of these descendants, the 1988 Thoroughbred stallion Innkeeper, has a new home at Virginia Tech's Middleburg Agricultural Research and Extension (MARE) Center.



Traditional Virginia Tech Hokie Stone prominent in lobby design of new Virginia Tech Research Center – Arlington

HokieStoneLlobby

The west lobby wall in the new Virginia Tech Research Center – Arlington is constructed of Virginia Tech's stone of tradition – familiarly and affectionately known as Hokie Stone. Since the mid-1950s, the university has mined this distinguishing limestone at its own quarry on the fringes of Blacksburg. In addition to the iconic Burruss Hall, every building around the Drillfield on the Blacksburg campus uses the material. In the 1990s the board of visitors passed a resolution to ensure continuation of its use in all university buildings constructed from that time forward.



Joshua Sinai joins editorial board of the Intelligencer: Journal of U.S. Intelligence Studies

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Joshua Sinai, associate professor/research at the Virginia Tech Center for Technology, Security, and Policy, has been named to the editorial board of the Intelligencer: Journal of U.S. Intelligence Studies. As a contributing editor, Sinai writes articles and book reviews on terrorism and counterterrorism related subjects to the biannual journal which is published by the Association of Former Intelligence Officers (AFIO), headquartered in McLean, VA.



Mahmood Khan invited to Armenia as instructor for senior level hospitality training program

khan story photo 1

Mahmood Khan, professor, Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management, Pamplin College of Business, National Capital Region, was recently invited to Armenia for the fourth time as instructor for a hospitality and restaurant management training course from the American National Restaurant Association (NRA) Educational Foundation's ManageFirst Program. The five-day training program was sponsored by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID)/Competitive Armenian Private Sector (CAPS) and the Armenian Restaurant Association and focuses on setting high management standards and enriching the skills and abilities of the workforce within the restaurant and hospitality industry. Some 36 restaurant owners, CEOs, and senior level managers attended the sessions and took an exam to earn a certificate from the program.



New issue of Public Administration Review features essays by CPAP faculty Anne Khademian and Matt Dull

anne khademian

Anne Khademian, professor and director, Center for Public Administration and Policy (CPAP), Virginia Tech National Capital Region, and Jim Hartmann, manager, City of Alexandria, Va., have coauthored the lead essay, "Culture Change Refined and Revitalized: The Road Show and Guides for Pragmatic Action" in the current edition of Public Administration Review (PAR). In the same issue, Matt Dull, assistant professor at CPAP, authored the response "Leadership and Organizational Culture: Sustaining Dialogue between Practitioners and Scholars."



Shinya Kikuchi awarded honorary doctorate in ceremonial conferment at Finland university

Conferment

Shinya Kikuchi, Charles E. Via Jr. Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and director, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Virginia Tech National Capital Region, was among nine major contributors to science and society chosen to receive an honorary doctorate at the Aalto University School of Science and Technology. Kikuchi attended the traditional ceremonial conferment in Finland last month. This ceremony marked the 21st in the field of technology and the first in the new Aalto University.



NCR offers more than 45 grad degree and certificate program; Commonwealth Campus non degree program also an option

NVC

The Virginia Tech Graduate School has been firmly planted in the National Capital Region since 1969. With humble beginnings in a Reston farmhouse, which served as the first graduate center, campuses today include the Northern Virginia Center (NVC) in Falls Church and the Washington Alexandria Architecture Center (WAAC) and an adjacent building on Prince Street in Old Town Alexandria. Classes for a new Information Security Assurance program scheduled to begin in fall 2011 will be held in the new Virginia Tech Research Center – Arlington, opening next summer. In total, 1,077 graduate students are now enrolled in more than 45 graduate degree programs taught by 120 full-time faculty members.



John Harrald authors article on community resilience strategy for Virginia in new Issues & Answers

JackHarrald

John Harrald, research professor at the Virginia Tech Center for Technology, Security, and Public Policy in the National Capital Region has authored "Creating Community Resilience: A Strategy for the Commonwealth" in the just released Fall 2010 issue of Virginia Issues & Answers, a public policy forum published by the Office of University Relations at Virginia Tech as an outreach service of the university.



Landscape architecture team interprets history of Glen Echo Park to garner first place in 2010 Theme Park Challenge

Glen Echo awards

A Virginia Tech National Capital Region landscape architecture team garnered first place in the Historic American Landscapes Survey (HALS) competition sponsored by the National Trust for Historic Preservation to document the landscapes of childhood. Entrants were asked to complete at least one HALS short format history for a historic theme park landscape. Associate Professor Paul Kelsch and three students from the Master of Landscape Architecture (MLA) Program – Nicholas Colombo, Seth Estep, and Luke Van Belleghem – chose to interpret the history of Glen Echo Park, Md., a National Park Service arts and culture venue for their 2010 Theme Park Challenge submission. The team was awarded the top prize for "Topographies of Amusement: The Evolving Terrain of Glen Echo Park" during the recent 2010 American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) Annual Meeting and Expo in Washington, D.C.



Doctoral student Nasim Sabounchi chairs Graduate Student Assembly in National Capital Region; encourages all students to actively participate

Nasim Sabounchi

Finding a way to balance life as a doctoral student, grad assistant, and chair of the Virginia Tech Graduate Student Assembly (GSA) in the National Capital Region might be a challenge, but Nasim Sabounchi, of Hamadan, Iran, seems to take it all in stride as she moves seamlessly from one role to another. And if all that weren't enough, she also finds time to pursue another interest. An avid outdoorswoman, Sabounchi hikes with various groups, including the Billy Goats in Great Falls.



Virginia Tech selects AboveNet to connect research facilities and data centers in Northern Virginia

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Virginia Tech has selected AboveNet, Inc. to connect Virginia Tech data centers and research locations including the new state-of-the art Virginia Tech Research Center – Arlington.  Virginia Tech's connected facilities will fuel the exchange of key data among its dispersed research facilities, corporate partners, and the larger academic community.



ALHRD has leading role at 59th annual American Association
of Adult and Continuing Education Conference

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Virginia Tech National Capital Region will be well represented at the American Association of Adult and Continuing Education (AAACE) 59th International Conference, Leading and Learning: Meeting Today's Challenges. Clare Klunk, faculty in the Adult Learning and Human Resource Development (ALHRD) Program, is AAACE President-Elect and serving as chair for the conference in Clearwater Beach, FL, October 25-29. Klunk and other Virginia Tech faculty and alumni will be making presentations during the conference which is expected to draw more than 500 attendees from 40 states and 12 countries.



Theresa Jefferson presents webinar on 'Impact of the New Madrid Seismic Zone Earthquakes on the Central USA'

Theresa Jefferson

Theresa Jefferson, research faculty at the Virginia Tech Center for Technology, Security, and Policy (CTSP) in the National Capital Region, recently presented a webinar, "Impact of the New Madrid Seismic Zone Earthquakes on the Central USA," sponsored by the Structural Engineers Association of Southern California (SEAOSC). SEAOSC is a professional organization of civil and structural engineers which also includes affiliated construction industry members and students.  



Workshop focuses on sleep, stress, and chronic pain as they relate to human health and performance in the military

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Sleep, stress, and chronic pain as they relate to human health and performance in the military was the topic explored during the Neuroimaging Technologies for Optimizing Performance workshop held in the National Capital Region last week. The Virginia Tech Arlington Innovation Center for Health Research (AIC:HR) sponsored the event underwritten by the Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center (TATRC) of the U.S. Army. "This workshop is the launch event for the center's research efforts in this area," said Seong K. Mun, professor and director of the AIC:HR. "The goal of our research is to help increase performance of our military at war and improve their health upon returning home from active duty.



VT IDEA hosts 'Lady Hokies in National Security'

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The national security community needs to engage more with college and high school students through campus visits and robust internship programs that encourage them to enter the intelligence field. Young people need to understand what a career in national security means on a real time basis and how they can make a contribution to the country. While recruiting the next generation of engineers is critical, there is also a need for people with expertise in other disciplines, including anthropology, geography, and business, in the national security arena.  In short, the future success of national security rests in knowledgeable and capable people from the backroom to the boardroom. 



SPIA kicks off new speaker series on Tuesday, September 21; open to VT community and the public

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Virginia Tech's School of Public and International Affairs (SPIA) in Alexandria will host the first speaker in the Virginia Tech Politics and Planning Speaker Series, on Tuesday, September 21. Louise Stanton, lawyer, assistant professor, New Jersey City University, and adjunct professor, political science, New York University, will present "Constitutional Divides in Intelligence Integration in the United States." Stanton argues that while globalization processes lead us to believe that lines between foreign and domestic are blurring and that states are no longer the principal actors in international affairs, today intelligence activities are still very much about states; geography matters in the constitutional operationalization of intelligence. Her talk explores the tensions between the nature of global threats and the state's legal ability to respond to them.



Mahmood Khan honored with first Brahim's Chair at Universiti Putra Malaysia in Kuala Lumpur

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Mahmood Khan, professor, Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management, Pamplin College of Business, National Capital Region, received the first Brahim's Chair in Foodservice and Hospitality Management from the Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), Kuala Lumpur, during a recent banquet and ceremony. Minister of Higher Education Dato Seri Mohamed Khaled Nordin formally honored Khan with the Professorship chair presented to UPM by Brahim's Corporation, an international food company headquartered in Malaysia. Among the guests were other members of the academic community, including UPM Vice Chancellor Prof Tan Sri Datuk Dr. Nik Mustapha Raja Abdullah and UPM Deputy Vice Chancellor for Research and Innovation Prof. Dato Dr. Abu Bakar Salleh. Representing Brahim's were Executive Chairman and CEO of Dewina Holdings Datuk Ibrahim Haji Ahmad Badawi, who acknowledged Khan's credentials, and Fatin Ibrahim, executive director of Dewina.



Capstone presentations highlight completion of Gateway to Academic Success in Language and Culture Institute program

Gateway class Library of Congress

The Virginia Tech Language and Culture Institute (VTLCI) English Language Program (ELP), held two six-week summer sessions to pilot Gateway to Academic Success, an innovative course designed by adjunct Michele Clark to equip advanced learners of English as a Second Language to succeed in the competitive and demanding world of academia at colleges and universities across the U.S. Classes were held at the Northern Virginia Center (NVC) in Falls Church, June through August, culminating with capstone presentations upon completion of each course.



EMBA students visit Germany, Czech Republic, and Austria to learn from businesses and experience local culture

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Twenty-two students, the Blue Ridge Cohort of the ExecutiveMBA(EMBA), traveled to Germany, the Czech Republic, and Austria this summer during a 10-day international residency trip required to complete the 18-month EMBA program.



Perrin Lieberman awarded first graduate student scholarship from National Capital Region Chapter of Virginia Tech Alumni Association

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Perrin Lieberman, of Annandale, Va., is the first graduate student in the National Capital Region (NCR) to be awarded an academic scholarship by the NCR Chapter of the Virginia Tech Alumni Association. She accepted the $1,000 scholarship at a recent awards ceremony.



City of Alexandria honors Jaan Holt with CIVIC Award

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Jaan Holt, professor and director of the Virginia Tech Washington Alexandria Architecture Center (WAAC) was awarded a 2010 Park and Recreation CIVIC Award from the City of Alexandria in recognition of his 30 years of exemplary service in design education, public outreach, and professional work in addition to instilling the core value of community service to alumni of the city's only academy of architecture and design. Holt accepted the award during a recent waterfront celebration of the City of Alexandria's 261st birthday.  The CIVIC Awards, presented for the past 25 years, recognize the unsung volunteer efforts of Alexandrians who provide a valuable service in meeting recreation, park, or cultural needs.



Ralph Buehler compares transport systems and travel behavior in Germany and U.S.; finds Germany offers greater access and promotes sustainability with policies that support walking, biking, and public transportation

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"Walking and cycling are more dangerous in the United States than in Western Europe, which may help explain why people walk and cycle less in America," Ralph Buehler, assistant professor, Urban Affairs and Planning said at the recent Green Living Series Forum, Biking, Walking, Public Transport: Smart Mobility for the 21st Century, cosponsored by the Goethe-Institut Washington and the Heinrich Boell Foundation. "Most German children take cycling lessons by the third or fourth grade and must pass a police-administered cycling safety test. Additionally, driver's training in Germany emphasizes the responsibility of motorists to protect vulnerable road users. The driver's examination includes specific questions about cyclists and pedestrians and students can fail the on-road driver's test if they do not drive defensively," he said at the Washington D.C. event.



VBI conference addresses issues of socially coupled systems and informatics in time of increasingly critical interdependencies

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New ideas about computing, informatics, and decision-making in a time of increasingly critical interdependencies among coupled social, economic, natural, and engineered systems were introduced at a conference sponsored by Virginia Bioinformatics Institute (VBI) held at the Lorien Hotel in Old Town Alexandria last week. About 60 people from across the United States and Europe were invited to attend the two-day conference, Socially Coupled Systems & Informatics: Science, Computing & Decision Making in a Complex Interdependent World, organized by Christopher Barrett, professor, director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory (NDSSL), and director of VBI, Virginia Tech National Capital Region, and Stephen Eubank and Madhav Marathe, deputy directors, NDSSL.



George Makrinos bikes Pacific Northwest to experience U.S. wilderness, promote alternative to fuel transportation, and raise money for Gulf oil disaster fund

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For the third consecutive year, George Makrinos, Virginia Tech alum (Master of Architecture, 2004) and adjunct faculty at the Washington Alexandria Architecture Center (WAAC),  is spending two months of the summer bicycling. This time the route is taking him 2,000 miles across the U.S. Pacific Northwest from Fairbanks, Alaska, to San Francisco, Calif.  Makrinos began the cycling tour on June 10 and rode 480 miles in Alaska before taking a ferry to Prince Rupert, British Columbia, Canada, to continue the journey. Earlier this month he was joined in Seattle by fellow Architecture alums Leo Salom (also a WAAC adjunct) and Brian Bolen. As their ride continues through the largest temperate rainforest in the world – home to a rich diversity of plants and animals and considered the last true wilderness region in the U.S. – they are raising money for The Center for Biological Diversity. One hundred percent of donations from Bicycle-Pacific-NW will go to the Gulf Disaster Fund.



AIC:HR organizes Workshop on Medical Home to focus on new primary care delivery system

Medical Home photo

The Virginia Tech Arlington Innovation Center for Health Research (AIC:HR) convened a Workshop on Medical Home last week to focus on a Patient Centered Medical Home (PC-MH) health care delivery model designed to facilitate partnerships among individual patients, their families, and physicians. "This primary care model depends on extensive support of care coordinators and uses registries, information technology, health information exchanges, and additional services to assure that patients receive timely, coordinated, and comprehensive care in a culturally appropriate manner," said workshop chair Seong K. Mun, professor and director of the AIC:HR.



Ultra high resolution projection screen makes its way to second floor of new Virginia Tech Research Center – Arlington

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A 20-foot ultra high resolution projection screen is hoisted to the second floor of the new Virginia Tech Research Center - Arlington. The 10-channel rear-projected Cyviz clusterwall (with 3-D upgrade capability), is being installed in the demonstration/visualization room in the building's conference center. The screen allows all manner of information to be visually presented in size, detail, and resolution that fosters the best of collaborative breakthroughs for scientists, researchers, intelligence analysts, and military command and control teams.



Grad student Mary Catherine Barganier elected chair of APA Student Representatives Council (SRC), will serve as advisor to APA board

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Mary Catherine Barganier of Fort Deposit, Al., a graduate student in the Master of Urban Planning (MURP) program in the College of Architecture and Urban Studies, was recently elected chair of the Student Representatives Council (SRC) of the American Planning Association (APA).  In addition to leading the SRC Executive Committee, she will serve a one-year term as advisor to the APA board of directors, providing a voice for students' interests. Barganier is the only student serving in this capacity. 



Five local government planning directors offer information and advice to UAP graduate students in National Capital Region

Planning directors panel

Urban Affairs and Planning (UAP) hosted a panel discussion for its graduate students in the National Capital Region recently to explore the current state and challenges of planning in Virginia, differences between private and public sector planning, and key qualifications for students seeking to land a job in urban planning. Jim Zook, Fairfax County planning directorand chair of the Planning Director's Section of the Virginia Chapter of the American Planning Association (APA) led the panel which included Planning Directors Bob Brosnan (Arlington County), Wayne Cilimburg (Albemarle County), Faroll Hamer (City of Alexandria), and Julie Pastor (Loudon County). The event took place in Alexandria.



National Capital Region honors Debbie Cash, Resource Center coordinator, University Libraries, with 2010 Outstanding Staff Award

Debbie Cash

Praised as "a true team player," and someone who "often goes above and beyond the specific request to really serve those she is assisting," Debbie Cash, Resource Center coordinator, University Libraries, is the Virginia Tech National Capital Region 2010 Outstanding Staff Award winner. The announcement was made by Jim Bohland, vice president and executive director, National Capital Region (NCR) Operations, during a recent staff appreciation celebration. The award, presented annually in recognition of "consistently exceptional service to the university," carries a $500 prize.



Hong Kong TV interviews disasters expert John Harrald about BP oil spill in Gulf of Mexico

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Hong Kong Phoenix Satellite Television's coverage of the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico includes comments from John Harrald, research professor, Virginia Tech Center for Technology, Security and Policy, and adjunct faculty, Public Administration and Policy. Ching-Yi Chang, Washington Bureau correspondent for Phoenix, the second largest television news station in China, interviewed Harrald in his National Capital Region office in Alexandria.



Ken Harmon receives 2010 College of Engineering Award for Outreach Excellence

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Associate Professor Ken Harmon, Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISE), National Capital Region, was recently awarded the 2010 Virginia Tech College of Engineering Award for Outreach Excellence. Harmon was in Blacksburg to accepted the award at the 13th Annual Engineering Faculty Reception held to honor two dozen faculty with various awards in teaching, research, service, and outreach.



New executive Master of Information Assurance program offers global approach beyond cyber security

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For the past five years, information assurance has been a major research focus at the Virginia Tech Advanced Research Institute (ARI). Knowledge garnered through this research, and a need within the government and business sectors for a broad overview of information assurance issues, has led Virginia Tech to create a new executive Master of Information Assurance (eMISA) degree aimed at mid to upper level professionals. The executive master's program, which will be offered in the National Capital Region, is now accepting applications for 2011. The cohort model weekend program will be limited to 25 students with a variety of undergraduate backgrounds in science and engineering



National Capital Region faculty honor Gabriella Belli as Last Lecture Series speaker

Belli Award

Gabriella M. Belli, associate professor of Educational Research and Evaluation, was invited by the National Capital Region (NCR) Faculty Association to give the third annual Last Lecture. Following Belli's lecture on the topic of her choice, "The Research Practice Gap: Role of the Academy in Society," Adjil Godrej, president of the NCR Faculty Association, presented her with a glass plaque honoring her service to the university and her dedication to Virginia Tech's graduate programs.



Helen He honored with Maryland Governor's Volunteer Service Award

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Xiaohui (Helen) He, administrative and program assistant, Natural Resources, National Capital Region, was awarded the annual Maryland Governor's Volunteer Service Award at a recent ceremony in the Miller Senate Office Building, Annapolis. He, a resident of Gaithersburg, Md., was recognized for her dedication and work with the Chinese community. About 200 people gathered for the event, held during National Volunteer Week.



EMBA Dominion Cohort spends 10-day residency in Hong Kong and Vietnam, combines visits to high-growth companies and cultural exploration

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Eighteen National Capital Region students in the ExecutiveMBA (EMBA) Dominion Cohort spent a 10-day international residency in Hong Kong and Vietnam before completing their 18-month program this spring.



2010 Day of Remembrance:  National Capital Region

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Blood drives and candlelight ceremonies marked the 2010 Day of Remembrance in the National Capital Region, honoring those who lost their lives and those who were injured in the campus tragedy of April 16, 2007.



Three CPAP Alexandria students honored with Larry Terry Outstanding Paper Award at annual High Table in Blacksburg

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Virginia Tech's High Table, an annual event held on the main campus in Blacksburg, "was an exciting opportunity for the students in Northern Virginia," according to Anne Khademian, professor and director of the Center for Public Administration and Policy (CPAP) in the National Capital Region. Three doctoral students from Alexandria were honored recipients of the Larry Terry Outstanding Paper Award and four others presented papers at the High Table's research symposium on the first of the two-day event.



Alan Thornhill named science advisor in Department of Interior's Minerals Management Service (MMS)

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Alan Thornhill, adjunct faculty, College of Natural Resources, has been appointed science advisor to Liz Birnbaum, director of Minerals Management Service (MMS), U.S. Department of the Interior.



Mahmood Khan conducts food safety seminar in Cyprus; helps USAID promote standards

Khan

Mahmood A. Khan, professor, Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management, Pamplin College of Business, National Capital Region, recently conducted a five-day seminar on food safety for 20 members of the Chamber of Food Engineers in Cyprus, Greece. This seminar was offered as part of his work on a United States Agency for International Development (USAID) project to develop food safety standards in Cyprus.



MLA students research and document more than 100 years of fun and recreation at Glen Echo Park

National Chautauqua Assembly

Paul Kelsch, associate professor, Landscape Architecture, is leading three Virginia Tech Washington Alexandria Architecture Center (WAAC) graduate students through an independent study project to research and document Glen Echo Park in Montgomery County, MD.  A destination for a broad cross-section of Washingtonians seeking fun and relaxation since the 1890s, Glen Echo Park provides a visible, physical record of changing American tastes and habits in recreation and family outings spanning more than 100 years.  Using standards established by the Historic American Landscape Survey (HALS), Luke VanBelleghem, Nicholas Colombo, and Seth Estep, all Master of Landscape Architecture (MLA) students, have been sorting through archival materials, property records, and other documents to better understand the historic significance of the property. 



CPAP doctoral student Mary Jo Wills is new ambassador to the Republic of Mauritius and the Republic of Seychelles

fAmb Mary Jo Wills

Mary Jo Wills, confirmed by the U.S. Senate as ambassador to the Republic of Mauritius and the Republic of Seychelles, recently presented her credentials to President of the Republic  Sir Anerood Jugnauth, at State House, Port St. Louis, Mauritius.  Wills, a career diplomat with more than 30 years of experience in international affairs, is a doctoral candidate at the Virginia Tech Center for Public Administration and Policy (CPAP) in the National Capital Region. Prior to her confirmation, Wills served as acting assistant secretary for Southern Africa Affairs and Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs in the Department of State, Bureau of African Affairs.  Previously, she held the position of director, Office of Southern Africa Affairs.



19th annual NCR alumni-sponsored job fair breaks new records; adds scholarships for graduate students enrolled in National Capital Region

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For the first time in its 19-year history of sponsoring the National Capital Region Job Fair, the  National Capital Region (NCR) Chapter of the Virginia Tech Alumni Association will use some of the money raised through this event to award scholarships to graduate students enrolled in the National Capital Region.  As in the past, scholarships will continue to be awarded to NCR-area high school seniors who have been accepted at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg.



Dr. Nat White named president of the American Association
of Equine Practitioners

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Dr. Nathaniel White II, the Jean Ellen Shehan Professor and director of the Marion duPont Scott Equine Medical Center, Leesburg, VA, has been inducted as president of the American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP).



WAAC Ph.D. students present Constructing Imagination: A Symposium on the ‘Matter' of Architectural Scholarship

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The recent growth of Ph.D. Architecture programs propelled Virginia Tech's five Ph.D. students at the Washington Alexandria Architecture Center (WAAC) into organizing Constructing Imagination: A Symposium on the "Matter" of Architectural Scholarship to explore the looming question of what constitutes architectural research. As a partial rebuttal to current architectural and intellectual trends in hyper-formalization, Carolina Dayer, Jonathan Foote, Andreea Mihalache, Annalisa Miller, and Ellen Sullivan designed the symposium to cultivate an "open imagination" through "meditation on matter," investigating the imagination through the joining together of architectural "stuff": materials, images, lines of ink, and lines of words. "In this way we seek the play between the invisible and the visible through the particularity of construction, both as a mode of thinking and as a physical act. The work of architectural scholarship thus follows similar principles as the work of architecture itself: both are demonstrations of imaginative constructions," the students wrote in the program.



Executive EMBA welcomes Great Falls Cohort with three-day orientation program

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The Executive MBA program in the Pamplin School of Business, National Capital Region, recently welcomed 17 students to the Great Falls Cohort with a three-day orientation program in Lansdowne, VA. This is the 12th cohort since the program's first in January 2004.



Bruce Lawlor leads seminar at DGI conference in London; supports use of metric oblique imagery in emergency response plans

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Retired Maj. Gen. Bruce M. Lawlor, director of the Center for Technology, Security, and Policy (CTSP) at Virginia Tech, National Capital Region, led a seminar at the recent 2010 Defence  {sic} Geospatial Intelligence (DGI) Europe Conference in London, England.  The seminar, Embracing New Technologies in a Post 9/11 World, focused on the use of metric oblique imagery. Lawlor, former chief of staff of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), was responsible for developing government strategy and policy decision making including overseeing interagency co-ordination.  A strong advocate of integrating metric oblique imagery into emergency response plans, Lawlor began the session by discussing his personal experiences with the creation of DHS -- how the government reacted, responded, and set new plans into motion including embracing new vital technologies like metric oblique imagery.



Pamplin Professor Michael Badawy authors lead article in The Handbook of Technology Management, published by Wiley

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Michael Badawy, professor of management at Virginia Tech's Pamplin College of Business, National Capital Region, has written the lead article in The Handbook of Technology Management, a three-volume, three-thousand page set published by Wiley (January 2010). The handbook, an authoritative reference source for state-of-the art information on variant topics of interdisciplinary dimensions and emerging issues in the technology and innovation management, financial, and technology operations fields, includes more than 200 articles written by scholars and professionals around the world. 



Lamine Mili chairs NSF-VT Resilient and Sustainable Infrastructures (RESIN) workshop in National Capital Region

LamineMili

Lamine Mili, professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering, recently chaired a two-day workshop sponsored by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and Virginia Tech in the National Capital Region. This workshop brought together about 60 people, including three principal investigators (PIs) and Co-PIs from each of eight NSF Emerging Frontiers in Research and Innovation (EFRI) Resilient and Sustainable Infrastructures (RESIN) funded projects, as well as program directors and representatives from academia, NSF, and industry to discuss theories and methods aimed at enhancing the resiliency and sustainability of interdependent critical infrastructures. 



Five Virginia Tech undergrads in National Capital Region for spring semester to participate in Capitol Hill internship program

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Five Virginia Tech undergraduate students from the Blacksburg campus are spending the spring semester in the National Capital Region to work as interns on Capitol Hill. They are the first to participate in a newly designed  internship program that has placed them in offices of U.S. Senators from Virginia  Mark Warner and Jim Webb,  U.S. Representatives from Virginia Rick Boucher (9th district) and Jim Moran (8th district), and the Clark Group,  a firm specializing in public and private sustainability, climate solutions, and renewable energy.



Graduate landscape architecture program ranked No. 2 in North America

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Virginia Tech's graduate landscape architecture program has been ranked No. 2 in North America, behind Harvard University in first place, in the 11th annual America's Best Architecture and Design Schools survey by DesignIntelligence on behalf of the Design Futures Council. The Master of Landscape Architecture program is offered both at the Washington Alexandria Architecture Center (WAAC) in the National Capital Region and in Blacksburg.



College of Natural Resources offers students summer opportunity to study and preserve nature and culture in China; application deadline is January 31

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The College of Natural Resources is offering a 21-day Study Abroad in China program, May 18 through June 8, 2010, for graduate and senior undergraduate students from any Virginia Tech college. Michael Mortimer, director of the Natural Resources program, National Capital Region, and David Robertson, visiting assistant professor, Forestry and Natural Resources, will lead the course, with the cooperation of Virginia Tech adjunct professor Dequn Zhou and Kunming University of Science and Technology. The six-credit course will immerse students in both culture and conservation in the Yunnan province in southwest China. This is the first time that Virginia Tech has offered students this opportunity.



CPAP annual Capital Praxis features Congressman Tom Davis as guest speaker at Roundtable on Leadership and Administration

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The Honorable Thomas M. Davis III, director, Deloitte Services, LLP, and former Congressman for the 11th District, Virginia, drew a standing room only audience for the annual Center for Public Administration and Policy (CPAP) Capital Praxis and Round Table on Leadership and Administration in Alexandria. Mary Jo Wills, a Ph.D. student in CPAP Alexandria, nominated by President Obama as Ambassador to the Republic of Mauritius and the Republic of Seychelles, also participated in the Capital Praxis event, leading the Capital Praxis MPA student discussion in the morning.



Andrea Wittenborn and research team conduct clinical trial to treat couples' depression and marital problems

SB Research Team 2009

Andrea Wittenborn, assistant professor, Human Development, is heading a research team conducting the Strengthening Bonds Couples Therapy Study to treat depression and marital problems (dyadic distress) in married/committed couple relationships.  The clinical trial began last summer and is funded by the Virginia Tech College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences (CLAHS) Dean's Faculty Fellowship.



David Orden gives presentation at trade and development symposium in conjunction with WTO ministerial meeting in Geneva

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David Orden, professor and director, Global Issues Initiative (GII), Institute for Society, Culture and Environment (ISCE) at Virginia Tech, National Capital Region, and senior research fellow at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), Washington DC, traveled to Geneva, Switzerland, last week to present a paper at an International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development (ICTSD) symposium. The symposium was held in conjunction with the seventh World Trade Organization (WTO) ministerial meeting. Orden spoke at the session, "Agricultural Subsidies in the WTO Green Box: Ensuring Cohesion with Sustainable Development Goals," which included a luncheon to launch a new book with the same title, edited by Ricardo Melendez-Ortiz, Christophe Bellman, and Jonathan Hepburn, Cambridge University Press, 2009.



Kris Wernstedt and Sonia Hurt to lead three-week 2010 summer program at Virginia Tech center in Switzerland; application deadline is February 1

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Associate Professor Kris Wernstedt and Assistant Professor Sonia Hirt, Urban Affairs and Planning, National Capital Region, will lead a three-week course, June 28 - July 23, 2010, at Virginia Tech's Center for European Studies and Architecture (CESA) in Riva San Vitale, Switzerland. The course will focus on contrasting European and American urban development patterns and urban policies -- at local, regional, national, and international levels -- and on differences in environmental policy and planning between Europe and the United States. It includes field trips and site visits with businesses, chambers of commerce, NGOs, and urban planning agencies in Switzerland, Italy, and Germany.



Mahmood Khan advances knowledge of marketing and food safety to hospitality industry in Armenia

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Mahmood Khan, professor, Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management, Pamplin College of Business, National Capital Region, has been in Armenia twice this fall for events fostering tourism and hospitality education sponsored by the Competitive Armenian Private Sector (CAPS) project. The CAPS project is a three-to-five year assistance program funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) to improve the business environment and foster cooperation among enterprises in a particular industry sector.



Seong Ki Mun and Chris Yianilos chosen from National Capital Region to participate in university's 2009-10 Executive Development Institute

EDI Steger

Seong Ki Mun, director, Neuroscience Initiative, and Chris Yianilos, director, Federal Relations, are among the 22 scholars who have been selected by University Organizational Development (UOD) to participate in the 2009-10 Executive Development Institute (EDI). Both Mun and Yianilos are based in the National Capital Region.



Randall Murch gives lecture on expanding role of forensics at University of Pittsburgh Center for National Preparedness

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Forensic science has long been known for its role in solving crimes, but it has lately taken on an increasingly important role in the investigation and prosecution of incidents involving weapons of mass destruction. The University of Pittsburgh's Center for National Preparedness (CNP) recently invited Randall S. Murch, associate director, Center for Technology, Security, and Policy at Virginia Tech National Capital Region and the former deputy director of the FBI Laboratory, to address the expanding role of forensics. His lecture was entitled "Integrating Investigation, Intelligence, Science, Operations, Policy and Law for Effective WMD Attribution." CNP is a multidisciplinary group that focuses on the prevention, protection, response, and recovery of catastrophic events through the research and collaboration of experts from 10 different university schools.



Barbara Allen and Daniel Breslau organize Society of Social Studies 2009 Annual Meeting in Washington D.C

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Organizing a conference with more than 1,000 attendees from around the globe is no small task. Just ask Barbara Allen, associate professor and director, Science and Technology Studies (STS), National Capital Region, and her Blacksburg colleague, Daniel Breslau, associate professor, STS, who co-chaired the recent 2009 Annual Meeting of the Society for Social Studies of Science (4S). The two of them have been organizing the four-day event in the Washington D.C. area for the past two and a half years, tending to a myriad of tasks and details along the way.



ARI awarded grants from National Science Foundation and Department of Defense to continue research on smart grid technologies

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The Virginia Tech Advanced Research Institute (ARI) has received two three-year grants, from the National Science Foundation (NSF) and from the Department of Defense (DOD) US Army Corps of Engineers Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), to continue research on smart grid technologies begun last year.



Community Café opens its doors at Northern Virginia Center

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With a snip of scissors, the Virginia Tech/University of Virginia Community Café officially opened its doors earlier this week at the Northern Virginia Center (NVC) in Falls Church. The Café located on the first floor of the Center, occupies the space that housed the bookstore until last spring. It has been renovated and attractively designed as a meeting place for the entire graduate school community. 



Joe Schilling works with communities to assess and revitalize vacant properties

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With the current surge in property foreclosures, thousands of vacant buildings are contributing to community decay in cities across the country.  As director of Policy and Research for the National Vacant Properties Campaign (NVPC), a Washington D.C. area program he helped launch, Joe Schilling, professor, Urban Affairs and Planning, and associate director for the Metropolitan Institute at Virginia Tech in the National Capital Region, is working directly with communities to assess vacant property and support their vacant property revitalization efforts.



MLA student Allison Thurmond receives honor award for design
at 2009 ASLA National Meeting

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"Reconciling Purity and Nature: A Bathing Pool for Daingerfield Island" has won Allison Thurmond (MLA '10) a National Student Honor Award in the General Design Category from the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA). Thurmond's design, which reinterprets a swimming hole using ecological processes and ancient hydrologic techniques, emerged as a response to a studio program for an aquatic center, led by Associate Professor Paul Kelsch at the Virginia Tech Washington Alexandria Architecture Center (WAAC).  Thurmond accepted the award at a recent ceremony which she and Kelsh attended during the ASLA annual meeting in Chicago.  Associate Professor Paul Emmons was also part of the studio at WAAC.



Matthew Dull, CPAP Alexandria, teams with Blacksburg Colleague to research presidential appointees and contribute to debate on reforms

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Matthew Dull, assistant professor, Center for Public Administration and Policy (CPAP), Alexandria, and his CPAP colleague in Blacksburg, assistant professor Patrick Roberts, are collaborating on a research initiative, the Appointees Project. The project was developed to inform public deliberation about the role of presidential appointees in the American political system and contribute to the debate about proposed reforms to the appointments process in federal government agencies.



NVC hosts reception for new associate deans of the Graduate School

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Faculty, staff, and students were invited to a recent reception at the Northern Virginia Center (NVC) to welcome the newly appointed associate deans of the Graduate School, Rosemary Blieszner and Janet Rankin.  They were introduced by Karen DePauw, dean of the Graduate School, who explained that the associate deans' positions are 50 percent half-time calendar year appointments to allow Blieszner and Rankin to continue teaching and research in their respective academic departments.



LUMENHAUS arrives at National Building Musem; Siemens sponsors related Sustainability Lecture

tional Building Museum

LUMENHAUS, an innovative solar house designed and constructed by a team of Virginia Tech faculty and students for the U.S. Department of Energy 2009 Solar Decathlon, has arrived in the National Capital Region from Blacksburg. Through September 27, it is on exhibit at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C., located outside the building at the intersection of 5th and F Streets. The team is making final improvements on the house before it moves to the National Mall to participate in the competition, which begins October 9.



Construction is underway for Virginia Tech's major research center in the Ballston area of Arlington, in the National Capital Region

Beckyholding_card_mid

Joining Virginia Tech President Charles W. Steger recently on a visit to the site of the research center in Ballston are (left to right) Seong K Mun, professor of Physics and research fellow at the Virginia Tech Institute for Advanced Study; Steger; Jim Bohland, vice president and executive director, Virginia Tech National Capital Region Operations; John Dooley, vice president for Outreach and International Affairs; Ted Settle, director, Office of Economic Development; and Bob Walters, vice president for research.



MLA students record Washington D.C.'s original boundary markers; photos appear in new issue of Virginia Tech Research magazine

Beckyholding_card_mid

Inspired by “line walking,” a common practice in the field of archaeology, Laurel McSherry, program director, master of landscape architecture (MLA), led 21 enthusiastic students on an expedition to the nation’s capital to create temporal recordings of the city from eight geographically separate vantage points.



Annals of the Association of American Geographers publishes article co-authored by SPIA Director Gerry Kearns

Executive MBA Cohort in Moscow

“Vital Geographies: Life, Luck, and the Human Condition,” an article by Gerry Kearns, professor, Government and International Affairs and director, School of Public  and  International Affairs (SPIA) and Simon Reid-Henry, Department of Geography, Queen Mary, University of London, has been published in the most recent (Volume 99, Issue 3, 2009) Annals of the Association of American Geographers.



Language and Culture Institute launches English Language Program in National Capital Region, prepares international Fulbright Scholars to attend U.S. universities this fall

Executive MBA Cohort in Moscow

The Virginia Tech Language and Culture Institute (LCI), newly established in the National Capital Region, launched its first English Language Program (ELP) classes this summer with six international Fulbright scholars from the countries of Chile, Russia, Syria, Pakistan, and Turkmenistan. The students were placed into the LCI by the U.S. Department of State as part of the Fulbright Foreign Student Program which requires international students to complete pre-academic" English before moving on to earn advanced degrees in a variety of majors at universities across the United States.



Executive MBA cohort travels to Finland and Russia on 10-day residency, culmination of 18-month program

Executive MBA Cohort in Moscow

A group of 25 students in the Shenandoah Cohort of Virginia Tech’s Executive MBA (EMBA) program travelled to Helsinki, Finland, and Moscow, Russia, for 10 days this summer, a culmination of their 18-month program.

The residency, led by EMBA Executive Director Charles Jacobina, incorporated both business and culture.  Ambassador Ilkka Heiskanen provided an overview of the country at the U.S. Embassy in Finland and AMCHAM  (the American Chamber of Commerce) arranged briefings by Microsoft Finland, Coca-Cola Finland, and Mirasys Ltd. Cultural experiences included a Helsinki samba festival and a visit to Suomenlinna, one of the several hundred islands that comprise Finland, where the students had an opportunity to dine in a number of traditional Finnish restaurants.



George Makrinos and John Foley bike across Europe; chart journey from Athens to London on the web

Foley and Makrinos 2000 km

George Makrinos’ love of bicycling and sense of adventure finds him biking  a 4,000 kilometers tour through the continent of Europe this summer.  Makrinos, a Virginia Tech alum and adjunct faculty at the Washington Alexandria Architecture Center (WAAC), last summer completed a 56-day, 14-state bicycle tour across America.  For “bike-EU” he is joined by an equally avid rider and enthusiast, Virginia Tech architecture alum John Foley.



CPAP names leading public management scholar Valerie Lemmie as second Inclusive Management Fellow

Valarie Lemmie

Commissioner Valerie Lemmie, Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO), a leading scholar on the subject of public management in enhancing democracy, was inaugurated last week as the second Inclusive Management Fellow of the Coast-to-Coast Inclusive Management Initiative within the Center for Public Administration and Policy (CPAP) and the School for Public and International Affairs (SPIA) at Virginia Tech, National Capital Region.



Virginia Tech alumna Regina E. Dugan named 19th director of DARPA; will lead agency in opening new technology frontiers

Regina Dugan

The Department of Defense (DoD) has announced that Regina E. Dugan, who earned her master's and bachelor's degrees at Virginia Tech, has been selected as the 19th director of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). DARPA is the principal agency within the DoD for research, development, and demonstration of concepts, devices, and systems that provide highly advanced military capabilities for the current and future combat force. In this role of developing high-risk, high-payoff projects, DARPA compliments and balances the overall science and technology program of the DoD.



CTSP Director Bruce Lawlor named to Pictometry board

Bruce Lawlor


Retired Maj. Gen. Bruce M. Lawlor, director of the Center for Technology, Security, and Policy (CTSP) at Virginia Tech, has been appointed to the board of directors of Pictometry International Corp., a leading provider of geo-referenced, aerial image libraries and related software headquartered in Rochester, NY.



Hundreds visit Marion duPont Scott Equine Medical Center open house to celebrate 25th anniversary

EMC anniv


Nearly 500 visitors helped Virginia Tech's Marion duPont Scott Equine Medical Center (EMC), Leesburg, VA, celebrate its 25th anniversary at a recent open house where a variety of demonstrations on live horses provided a first-hand look at the center's high-quality health care services for all ages and breeds of horses.



Artist/muralist Rik Freeman brings his Chittlin's Circuit Review series based on the blues to Northern Virginia Center

Rik Freeman


In 1994 artist/muralist Rik Freeman wrote “The Ballad of the Grit Girl,”the inspiration for his 2008 painting by the same name. It is included in Freeman's exhibit of oil on canvas paintings, The Chittlin Circuit Review, displayed on the first floor of the Northern Virginia Center (NVC) at 7054 Haycock Road, Falls Church. The show runs until June 27.



Alexandria City Manager Jim Hartmann offers insights to SPIA students on achieving high performance local government in hard times

Jim Hartmann


Facing budget cuts is never easy but Alexandria City Manager Jim Hartmann is up to the challenge.  The City has 260 fewer positions than last year and 117 of them have been permanently eliminated, according to Hartmann. “When budgets are cut, it creates an opportunity for change,” he told School of Public and International Affairs (SPIA) students during a “Conversation on High Performance Local Government in Hard Times.” Adjunct faculty Tom Hickok, who teaches a High Performing Local Governments class, invited Hartmann to Virginia Tech and conducted the recent interview. 



Elizabeth Morton appointed to advisory group for Fairfax County Office of Community Revitalization and Reinvestment

Elizabeth Morton


Elizabeth Morton, professor in practice, Urban Affairs and Planning, and director of the Planning Academy at Virginia Tech, was recently appointed to the Fairfax County Office of Community Revitalization and Reinvestment (OCRR) Advisory Group. The group assists the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors and agency staff with strategic redevelopment and investment opportunities within targeted commercial areas that align with the community's vision and improve the economic vitality, appearance, and function of those areas.



Elizabeth Schilling presents final 2008-2009 New Metropolis lecture; series will resume in the fall with focus on international issues and climate change

Elizabeth Schilling


Elizabeth Schilling, interim program manager, Smart Growth Leadership Institute, Washington, DC, presented the final lecture in the 2008-2009 New Metropolis Lecture Series, sponsored by Urban Affairs and Planning (UAP) in Alexandria. Schilling’s presentation LEED for Neighborhood Development: The Next Wave of Code Reform? focused on the new LEED rating system for making a neighborhood green and how the rating system works as a tool for planners.



WAAC students merge creative concepts of dance and space to design dance studio in Arlington

WAAC Dance Studio


Elements of dance and dance theatre, including movement and exercise, flowing costumes, and expressive lighting inspired students in the Architecture Master's design studio at the Washington Alexandria Architecture Center (WAAC) to imagine innovative ways of merging public and private space for a dance studio in nearby Arlington.



National Capital Region honors Michele Eldredge, administrative assistant, Human Development, with 2009 Outstanding Staff Award

Eldredge


Michele Eldredge, administrative assistant, Human Development, was recognized by Virginia Tech National Capital Region as the 2008 Outstanding Staff Award winner during a recent staff appreciation celebration. The award is presented annually in recognition of “consistently exceptional service to the university” and carries a $500 prize.

In making the announcement, Jim Bohland, vice president and executive director, National Capital Region Operations, said that in her nomination Eldredge was cited for having “consistently shown outstanding commitment and dedication to the students, her program, and Virginia Tech” for the past 12 years.



National Capital Region faculty honor Rosary Lalik as Last Lecture Series speaker

Rosary Lalik in Last Lecture Series


Rosary Lalik, associate professor emerita and former director of Graduate Education Programs, was chosen by the National Capital Region Faculty Association as the speaker for the second annual Last Lecture Series. The Last Lecture Series was inaugurated last year to honor faculty in the region for service to the university and dedication to Virginia Tech's graduate programs. Each speaker is invited to choose a topic of his/her choice to present to an open audience, which includes current and former colleagues, students, alumni, and friends. The lecture takes place on Virginia Tech's official Reading Day, the day after classes end and before exams begin.



Ralph Buehler presents report for Brookings Institution about sustainable transportation in Germany and the United States

Ralph Buehler


Ralph Buehler, assistant professor, Urban Affairs and Planning, has coauthored a report on policies/planning, travel behavior, and sustainable transportation in Germany and the United States, released by the Brookings Institution Metropolitan Policy Program during a recent event at the German Embassy in Washington, DC. There, Buehler presented the peer-reviewed report, “Making Transportation Sustainable: Insights from Germany,” which he authored with John Pucher, Rutgers University, and Dr. Uwe Kunert, German Institute of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, Germany.



Gerard Toal's career award lecture published in current issue
of Political Geography

Gerard Toal


Last year Gerard Toal, professor and director of Virginia Tech’s Government and International Affairs (GIA) program in the National Capital Region, was honored with a career award in the field of geography by the Political Geography Specialty Group and Elsevier, publisher of the journal, Political Geography. This recognition included an invitation to lecture at the Association of American Geographers annual meeting. A modified and expanded version of Toal's lecture has been published in the current issue of Political Geography.



Joseph Wang leads research to differentiate between aggressive and slow growing cancers; strives for more tailored patient treatment

Yue (Joseph) Wang


A team of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) researchers led by Yue (Joseph) Wang, professor of Electrical, Computer, and Biomedical Engineering, has helped identify biomarkers that can differentiate between aggressive and slow growing prostate cancers and between different levels of aggressiveness in ovarian cancers.



National Capital Region Remembers April 16, 2007

Magnolia tree planted in Alexandria


The Virginia Tech Community in the National Capital Region honored those who lost their lives and those who were injured in the campus tragedy of April 16, 2007 in a number of ways yesterday.

At the campus in Old Town Alexandria, a "green giant"magnolia tree was planted on the corner of Patrick and Henry Streets at the Washington Alexandria Architecture Center (WAAC).



Students, faculty, and alumni from CPAP Alexandria participate in
High Table

CPAP students attending hightable


For centuries Oxford and Cambridge Universities have maintained a tradition that faculty and students eat together wearing their academic regalia. They may be joined on these occasions by Fellows of the college, usually graduates who have distinguished themselves in some way. Honored guests are seated at the High Table and, typically, one of them is asked to speak on a substantial topic.



NCR launches new social networking site to help foster greater sense of community

Social Network Site


The National Capital Region (NCR) has launched a social networking site, hokies.ncr.vt.edu, designed to support our graduate programs, to help graduate students connect, and to let prospective, current and former students interact with one another and with faculty and staff. Hosted on Ning.com, the site is managed by the Graduate Students Services Office (GSSO) and has features similar to Facebook, allowing members to share images, create blogs, chat, post events, and create groups and threaded discussions, etc. Unlike Facebook and other mega-sites, though, hokies.ncr.vt.edu is a controlled-access site, so new members have to be approved before they can get beyond the main page.



More than 1,500 prospective job applicants and 79 employers join for 18th annual job fair at NVC; event raises in excess of $25,000 for scholarship fund

Job Fair at NVC


More than 1,500 prospective job applicants attended the 18th Annual Northern Virginia Regional Job Fair at the Northern Virginia Center (NVC) in Falls Church where 79 employers, ranging from private companies to government agencies, were represented. The annual job fair is a fundraiser sponsored by the Virginia Tech National Capital Region (NCR) Alumni Association. The group raised more than $25,000 for scholarships which are awarded to National Capital Region-area high school seniors who have been accepted at Virginia Tech. The event is free for those who attend, however, employers are charged a fee to participate.



Landscape architecture pioneer Rosa Grena Kliass gives lecture at Washington Alexandria Architecture Center

McSherry (left) and Kliass

McSherry (left) and Kliass


Rosa Grena Kliass, who began her career in landscape architecture more than fifty years ago, is a renowned pioneer in the field. Last week, Kliass, visiting from her native Brazil, gave a lecture on Scale and Significance: Main Issues for Landscape Architecture at the Washington Alexandria Architecture Center (WAAC) before a full house of students, faculty, administrators, and other interested visitors. She was introduced by Laurel McSherry, director of Virginia Tech's master's landscape architecture program in the National Capital Region.



Computer science doctoral students win second prize in poster contest
at National Academy of Engineering's Grand Challenges Summit

Jing (David) Dai presenting the winning poster

Jing (David) Dai presenting
the winning poster


Jing (David) Dai, Arnold Boedihardjo, and Feng Chen, doctoral students in the Computer Science program, were awarded second prize in the Security Category of the National Academy of Engineering's (NAE) Grand Challenges Summit poster contest. The judging took place during the two-day summit held March 2-3 at Duke University in North Carolina. The poster, "HOMES: Highway Operation Monitoring and Evaluation System," introduces an advanced transportation information system developed in the Spatial Data Management Lab at the Falls Church Northern Virginia Center (NVC), in collaboration with the Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT).



Karen Akers, director of Northern Virginia Center, recognized for commitment to Falls Church City Public Schools

Karen Akers


Karen Akers, director of the Northern Virginia Center (NVC) was named Business in Education (BIE) Partner of the Week by the Falls Church City Public Schools (FCCPS). Akers was recognized for serving on the BIE Advisory Committee, volunteering as a presenter for Mary Ellen Henderson Middle School Career Week, and providing meeting space at NVC for FCCPS in-service training with administrators and teachers.



Professor Susan Piedmont-Palladino, curator at National Building Museum, conducts online video tour of Green Community; exhibit runs through October 25

Susan Piedmont-Palladino in Green Community Video


Susan Piedmont-Palladino, professor, Washington Alexandria Architecture Center (WAAC), and curator at the National Building Museum, Washington DC, is narrator for an online video tour of the museum's current Green Community exhibition showing what makes a community green. A green community conserves its land, offers multiple transportation options, provides open spaces, and uses natural and cultural resources wisely.



Beverly Bunch-Lyons researches first rural NAACP in Falls Church; finds early Tinner Hill community activists fought segregation and contributed to civil rights history

Bunch-Lyons

Bunch-Lyons at Tinner Hill
arch in Falls Church
(Photo by Jim Stroup)


The NAACP is celebrating its 100th anniversary this year with more than 1,700 branches worldwide. But when the NAACP was nine years old, the first rural chapter was in Falls Church, Va., when the now-metropolitan area was considered the rural South. On Tinner Hill, just a few miles away from Virginia Tech's Northern Virginia Center (NVC) in Falls Church, stands a 15-foot pink granite archway. Erected in 1999 by the Tinner Hill Heritage Foundation, the memorial honors two men who, in June 1918, helped found the first rural branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP): Edwin Bancroft "E.B." Henderson and Joseph B. Tinner.



Virginia Tech YouTube site wants more videos, WAAC's Boxes still a favorite

Virginia Tech Boxes


The Virginia Tech YouTube website features a wide variety of Virginia Tech-related videos including Virginia Tech Boxes, produced by students at the Washington Alexandria Architecture Center (WAAC). Boxes has been designated a "favorite" and has had more than 36,000 views since it was posted a year ago. Set to music, the video follows a group of architecture students as they parade through a wintry Old Town Alexandria in large cardboard boxes.



Virginia Tech alum authors How Fit is Your Business, draws parallel between personal health and business fitness

How Fit is Your Business_Front Cover


Mark Richardson, CR, a Virginia Tech alum (Arch '78), has authored a new book titled How Fit is Your Business? A Complete Checkup and Prescription for Better Business Health (Advantage Media, 2008). The book transcends the business arena, drawing a unique parallel between personal health and the health and fitness of a business.

"We know what the concept of being fit and healthy means on a personal level but there are many misconceptions of what fit means to a business," said Richardson. "Much like wellness, the paradigm of business has changed. How Fit is Your Business? is designed to take the reader through a fitness check up, drilling through ten elements of business fitness."



Red Cross volunteer Denise Orden takes VT-ENGAGE to Washington DC National Mall for presidential inauguration

Denise Orden on presidential inauguration

(Photo by Heidi Sung)


Denise Orden (on the right with a fellow volunteer), associate director for operations in the National Capital Region, was one of millions of people in Washington DC for events surrounding the historic inauguration of President Barack Obama. She spent two full days (Sunday, January 18, and Tuesday, January 20) on the Mall as a Red Cross volunteer. VT-ENGAGE is Virginia Tech's volunteerism initiative through which faculty, staff, students, alumni, and friends of the university can honor those we lost April 16 through community service. Orden has been a Red Cross volunteer for the past two years.



Energy Efficiency Market newsletter interviews with Saifur Rahman about Obama's energy proposals now available on podcast

Saifur Rahman


Saifur Rahman, professor and director, Virginia Tech Advanced Research Institute (ARI), serves as vice president of new initiatives and outreach for the IEEE Power and Energy Society. In that capacity, he was interviewed three times over the past few months by the Energy Efficiency Markets newsletter about President-elect Barack Obama's energy proposals and their effect on the world wide energy crisis. The interviews are now available on the publication's Podcast website and can also be accessed from the links below.



David Orden addresses global agricultural policies at two recent international conferences

David Orden


David Orden, director of the Global Issues Initiative (GII), Institute for Society, Culture and Environment (ISCE), addressed agricultural policies in a global context at two recent international conferences.

The first event was an expert workshop at the United Nation's Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) in Rome, Italy, where he presented the lead paper on "Farm Support Policies of the United States." The purpose of the workshop was to develop recommendations for policy initiatives for the director general of the FAO.



Fred Krimgold interviewed for Dan Rather Reports story on the future of Galveston, Texas, in the aftermath of Hurricane Ike

Fred Krimgold Interviewed


Fred Krimgold, director, Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) Program, Virginia Tech, National Capital Region, was interviewed for a taped segment about the future of Galveston, Texas, in the aftermath of Hurricane Ike on Dan Rather Reports, which aired on HDTV, Tuesday, December 16. This past September, the tropical storm caused such massive destruction to the city that, according to Krimgold, the property damage alone could be as high as $18 billion.



Barbara Allen runner-up in Dance Your Ph.D. video competition sponsored by American Association for the Advancement of Science

Barbara Allen Dance


Barbara Allen, associate professor and director, Science and Technology Studies, Virginia Tech National Capital Region, danced her way to a runner-up award in the video competition, Dance Your Ph.D., sponsored by the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Allen, in the role of "expert" scientist, was joined by six performers from the local Bowen McCauley Dance (BMD) troupe to interpret the findings of her dissertation: "Uneasy Alchemy: Citizens and Experts in Louisiana's Chemical Corridor Disputes" (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Science and Technology Studies, 1999).



Eco-City Studio launches blog to encourage community involvement in City of Alexandria sustainability efforts

Eco-City studio


The Eco-City Studio, Department of Urban Affairs and Planning, recently launched the Eco-City Alexandria Blog to enable and support a healthy conversation between members of the Alexandria community and the City of Alexandria Environmental Policy Commission (EPC). The blog offers Alexandria residents, employees, businesses, organizations, associations, and city government an opportunity to share ideas about how to make the City of Alexandria ecologically sustainable. Ecological sustainability employs a systems approach to address the environmental, economic, and social elements of an eco-city.



Nick Stone, National Capital Region Operations, chosen to participate in university's 2008-2009 Executive Development Institute

Nick Stone


Nick Stone, deputy director, National Capital Region Operations, is among 21 scholars selected by University Organizational Development (UOD) to participate in the 2008-09 Executive Development Institute (EDI), designed to cultivate Virginia Tech's leaders by providing multiple approaches to career enhancement and development. EDI is a personalized awareness-building and goal-setting program that complements other educational activities, current or future leadership course work, coaching, or "community of practice" involvement.



Randy Murch discusses 'Anthrax 2001 and Beyond' at international conference on bioterrorism

Randy Murch


Randy Murch, associate director, Research Program Development, National Capital Region, and an adjunct professor in the School of Public and International Affairs, was invited to give a presentation on  “Bioterroism: Investigation & Prosecution – Anthrax 2001 and Beyond ” during a recent Wilton Park, United Kingdom, conference on the Counterproliferation of Biological Threat Agents.



Urban Affairs and Planning students in Alexandria welcome visitors
from the University of Kaiserslautern, Germany

Students from Virginia Tech and University of Kaiserslautern


Virginia Tech's Department of Urban Affairs and Planning (UAP) recently welcomed a group of visiting students from the University of Kaiserslautern, Germany. The students traveled to the metropolitan Washington D.C. area to study suburbanization in the United States. Heike Mayer, associate professor, UAP, and co-director, Metropolitan Institute; Ralph Buehler, assistant professor, UAP, and a number of graduate students from Virginia Tech's UAP program in Old Town Alexandria, joined the German students for a module class to examine Arlington County as a best practice case in urban regeneration. The visit was documented by a film crew for a future documentary on the history of Smart Growth in Arlington.



New Board of Visitors member Doug Fahl focuses on recruiting more active alums and advocating for stronger Virginia Tech presence in National Capital Region

Doug Fahl


Virginia Tech's motto Ut Prosim (that I may serve) is not something that Doug Fahl, executive vice president, Dewberry & Davis LLC, takes lightly. To me, it is a philosophy that continues to make a difference in my life," he says with conviction.

Fahl has dedicated countless hours of service to his alma mater. He has worked tirelessly to encourage fellow alums to support the university and is a strong advocate for increasing Virginia Tech's presence in the National Capital Region.



Robert Lang, co-director of Metropolitan Institute, interviewed about suburban voting patterns during 2008 presidential campaign

Robert Lang


Throughout the 2008 presidential campaign, major media outlets, including CNN, The Wall Street Journal, and USA Today have interviewed Robert Lang, co-director, Metropolitan Institute (MI) at Virginia Tech, about suburban voting patterns and their importance on election outcomes. Most recently, Lang was quoted extensively in a Monday, October 20th front-page story in The Washington Post, “Democrats See Opportunity In Outer Suburbs' Troubles.”



Five FDA students are first to receive graduate degree from
Virginia Tech - Georgetown University joint program

FDA graduates

(Photo by Sorell Schwartz,
Georgetown University
)


Five students from the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) are the first to be awarded the joint Master of Science in Biomedical Technology Development and Management (BTDM) degree from Virginia Tech and Georgetown University. The new BTDM degree, which draws on the strengths of Virginia Tech's science and technology programs and Georgetown's basic and clinical medical research assets, represents the first collaboration of this kind between the two universities.



Rosary Lalik honored at retirement reception celebrating her 26-year career in the School of Education

Rosary Lalik honored at retirement reception

(Photo by Gabriella Belli)


University faculty, staff, graduate assistants, students, friends, and family members gathered recently at a retirement reception for Rosary Lalik to recognize and celebrate her 26-year career at Virginia Tech. Lalik, an expert in literacy studies, relocated to the northern Virginia campus from Blacksburg in 2000 and has served as director of Education programs for the last four years.



Local artist Lisa Neher gives talking tour at Northern Virginia Center; exhibit is part of Falls Church Arts/Gallery Without Walls program

Lisa Neher at NVC

(Photo by Lise Visser)


Local artist Lisa Neher recently conducted a talking tour of her 18 oil paintings which were displayed for more than two months at the Northern Virginia Center (NVC). The exhibit, on the first floor lobby level and in the library, was mounted in conjunction with the Falls Church Arts/Gallery Without Walls program to present artists’ works in venues which include local buildings and businesses.



Michael Badawy gives keynote address on global competitiveness at International Conference on Management of Innovation and Technology in Bangkok

Michael Badawy in Bangkok

(File Photo)


Michael Badawy, professor, Management of Technology and Strategic Management, Pamplin College of Business, was invited recently to give a keynote address at The International Conference on Management of Innovation and Technology in Bangkok, Thailand. Badawy explored the question: “Are We Losing the Battle in Managing Technology for Global Competitive Advantage?” The conference brought together scholars, educators, industrialists, and entrepreneurs interested in improving research and development, and business applications in innovation and technology management across a global network of diverse platforms.



The Energy Efficiency Partnership of Greater Washington, founded and facilitated by Virginia Tech in the National Capital Region, featured in The Voice of Technology

Compact fluorescent bulb


The Fall 2008 issue of The Voice of Technology, published by the Northern Virginia Technology Council, prominently features the Energy Efficiency Partnership (EEP) of Greater Washington.  EEP, an initiative founded and facilitated by Virginia Tech in the National Capital Region, aims to reduce energy use through building retrofits. In the article, “Do More By Using Less,” Laurel Colless, director of the EEP and senior project associate for research at Virginia Tech, joins other EEP partners and “green” advocates to explain why helping the environment is also good for business.



Nine Virginia Tech student fellows honored at recent convocation for completing Washington Semester program

Washington Semester Fellows

Valerie Lemmie (left)
and Anne Khademian


Nine Virginia Tech student fellows were honored recently at a special convocation ceremony for having successfully completed an 11-week Washington Semester program in the National Capital Region. Students from the School of Public and International Affairs in Blacksburg who received certificates for this summer's program are: Olivia Leonard, Ryan Little, Jackie Pontious, Erin Taylor, Michelle King, Dan Dunn, Andrew Robb, Brian Reid, and Kelley Umberger. The convocation guest speaker was Valerie Lemmie, Commissioner of the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio. This is the 14th year that Virginia Tech has offered this program.



'Critical Geopolitics' expert Gerard Toal writes opinion column on Ossetia conflict published recently in Irish Times

Gerard Toal

 


Gerard Toal, professor of Government and International Affairs, National Capital Region, is an expert in the intersecting field of geography and international relations known as "Critical Geopolitics."

A native of Ireland, Toal wrote a recently published opinion column in Irish Times, "Ossetia ordeal ill-served by cold war logic." He says that Cold War geopolitics is back with deep ethnic tensions, an impetuous Georgia and Russian fears all playing a part in the Ossetia conflict.



George Makrinos bikes across America to fulfill a personal dream, to encourage alternate modes of transportation, and to benefit charities

George Makrinos


Ask George Makrinos what he did on his summer vacation and his reply will take you on a 3,360 mile journey across America. Beginning in San Francisco, Makrinos, a Virginia Tech alum and current adjunct faculty at the Washington Alexandria Architecture Center (WAAC), rode his 21-speed titanium frame mountain bike for 56 days through 14 states and four time zones. Built for touring, the bike carried four pannier bags containing everything he needed: tools, tent, maps, sleeping bag, clothing, and electronics, which included a laptop, digital camera, and GPS...



Virginia Sustainable Building Network honors Virginia Tech with Best Green Business Innovation Award for founding the Energy Efficiency Partnership of Greater Washington

Laurel Colless receives VSBN Award

Laurel Colless


Virginia Tech received the Best Green Innovation Award from the Virginia Sustainable Building Network (VSBN) recently for its role as founder and facilitator of the Energy Efficiency Partnership (EEP) of Greater Washington. Laurel Colless (at podium), senior project associate for research at Virginia Tech, National Capital Region, and EEP director, accepted the award on behalf of Virginia Tech. The presentation was made during VSBN’s 13th Anniversary Celebration and Annual Meeting in Richmond recently, where Virginia Governor Timothy Kaine gave the keynote address.



Pamela Murray-Tuite, assistant professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering, named Business in Education Partner of the Week by Falls Church City Public Schools for organizing internship at Northern Virginia Center

Pamela Murray-Tuite


Pamela Murray-Tuite, assistant professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering, was recently named Business in Education (BIE) Partner of the Week by the Falls Church City Public Schools (FCCPS) for organizing an internship program for George Mason High School students. Internships were open to students during the school year and during the summer at the Northern Virginia Center. Murray-Tuite was also cited by FCCPS for speaking on Career Day to seventh grade students at Mary Ellen Henderson Middle School...



G. Wayne Clough, former dean of Virginia Tech's College of Engineering is elected Secretary of Smithsonian Institution; award winning engineer brings unique combination of experience to position

G. Wayne Clough

 


G. Wayne Clough, who served as dean of the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech from 1990 to 1993, was unanimously elected the 12th Secretary of the Smithsonian by the Institution's Board of Regents earlier this year, and officially assumed his position July 1. Clough joined Virginia Tech in 1983 as a professor of civil engineering and was later promoted to department head before being named dean of the department.

He left Virginia Tech to serve as president of his alma mater, Georgia Tech, where he had earned both his bachelor's and master's degrees in civil engineering...



NVTC summer internship launch offers opportunity to dialogue with Virginia's Secretary of Technology, network, and identify strategies for success

Interns

 


The Northern Virginia Technology Council (NVTC) Workforce Committee recently launched this summer's internships at a meeting organized by Barbara Bennett, associate director, Outreach Program Development, Virginia Tech National Capital Region, and co-chair of the committee. Student interns and their supervisors at NVTC member companies gathered to dialogue with guest speaker, Aneesh P. Chopra, Secretary of Technology, Commonwealth of Virginia, to network with one another, and to identify strategies to make most of summer internship opportunities...



Virginia Tech announces plan to build major research center in National Capital Region; Ballston location identified with expected occupancy in 2010

Congressman Jim Moran

(Photo by John McCormick)

Congressman Jim Moran, of Virginia's Eighth Congressional District, was a guest speaker at the Arlington Westin Gateway when Virginia Tech President Charles W. Steger (seated at right) announced that Virginia Tech will build a major research center in the Ballston area of Arlington. The building is part of a larger JBG Companies' development project located on the 800-900 block of North Glebe Road...



CNBC Business Nation interviews David Orden, professor in the Virginia Tech Institute for Society, Culture, and Environment (ISCE), for segment on the thriving U.S. tobacco industry

David Orden

Despite the proliferation of anti-smoking rules, and an ever-growing emphasis on health, tobacco farmers are thriving in the U.S., with some 350 million acres devoted to tobacco farming. The industry's growth is attributed, in large part, to the government's 2004 disbanding of the quota system for tobacco farmers. Orden is interviewed in the CNBC segment, "Growing The Golden Leaf,"about how agriculture can benefit from a free global market...



Virginia Tech Hybrid-Electric Vehicle takes detour to Northern Virginia Center; team works four years to design and build the fully functional car for national competition

Hybrid Electric Car Team

The Virginia Tech Hybrid Electric Vehicle and a team of ’08 Mechanical Engineering graduates took a short detour to the Northern Virginia Center (NVC) recently on the way to Washington D.C. for the General Motors (GM) and U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Challenge X: Crossover to Sustainable Mobility student engineering competition. For the past four years, the Virginia Tech team has been working to design and build a fully-functional hybrid electric vehicle based on the competition’s requirements. The team made some last minute repairs to the vehicle at the NVC parking lot, which attracted the attention of a number of staff, faculty, and students.



National Capital Region honors Myriam Lechuga, School of Public and International Affairs, with 2008 Outstanding Staff Award

Myriam Lechuga Certificate

Virginia Tech National Capital Region honored Myriam Lechuga, administrative assistant, School of Public and International Affairs, with the 2008 Outstanding Staff Award during a recent staff appreciation luncheon. The award is presented in recognition of “consistently exceptional service to the university” and carries a $500 prize.

In the outpouring of support by the faculty and students in the department, Lechuga was lauded as “an exceptional individual who does everything within her power to improve the quality of work life for faculty, staff and students,” as a “thorough and creative problem solver,” and as having a “gracious and diligent spirit.”



David Trauger, honored by NCR Faculty Association as first speaker in the 'Last' Lecture Series, discusses The Great Transformation: 2001-2030

David Trauger receiving glass plaque

(Photo by Justin Davenport)

David L. Trauger, director of the Natural Resources Program and associate dean of the Graduate School was chosen by the National Capital Region Faculty Association to give the first 'Last' Lecture of the Last Lecture Series. Trauger, who is retiring from Virginia Tech after seven years, was presented a plaque by the Faculty Association with "esteem and admiration for his dedication to graduate education and the Virginia Tech community in the National Capital Region."

The Last Lecture Series allows the speaker to choose a topic of his/her choice and present it to an open audience including current and former colleagues, alumni, and friends. Trauger spoke about The Great Transformation: 2001-2030...



David Orden, professor in the Virginia Tech Institute for Society, Culture and Environment (ISCE), joins panel on NPR's The Diane Rehm Show

David Orden

Rising food prices have become a critical global issue and world leaders are looking for solutions that will ease the crisis. David Orden joins a panel of experts to discuss the world's rising food prices: what's behind the higher prices and what can be done
about it.

  • Listen to the broadcast which aired on April 16, 2008.




WAAC professors and students create visionary scenarios for Annapolis in the year 2060 at charrette to address economic, ecological, and demographic pressures

EnVISIONing Annapolis

What will Annapolis look like in the year 2060?

A group of Washington Alexandria Architecture Center (WAAC) faculty and students were among several universities to accept the challenge of imagining - - and designing - - the answer to that question when they participated in a recent design charrette sponsored by the enVISIONing Annapolis Foundation. The WAAC team worked on long-term strategies that address how Annapolis might adapt to the many economic, ecological, and demographic pressures it is already facing.

Participating from Virginia Tech were Architecture Professors Paul Emmons (who served as the team leader) and Marcia Feuerstein, Landscape Architecture Professor Laurel McSherry, and Adjunct Professors Steven Siebert and Leo Salom. Ellen Sullivan, a Ph.D. student, graduate architecture students Lesley Golenor, Matthew Valentine, Josh Housdan, and Beth Barrett, undergraduate architecture student Michael Ford and undergraduate landscape architecture student Ryan Catlett...




Graduate students from Virginia Tech National Capital Region and George Mason University team up on local environmental community service project to support The Big Event 2008

Big Event Group Shot

The Big Event, Virginia Tech's largest community service project, is held each spring in Blacksburg. Students come together on this day to say thanks to surrounding communities in the area for being a gracious host to the university for nine months out of the year and for their continuous support. For the first time this year, the National Capital Region Graduate Student Assembly (GSA) put a local twist on The Big Event. Virginia Tech graduate students teamed up with graduate students from nearby George Mason University to work on a community service project to benefit the northern Virginia community...




National Capital Region Remembers April 16, 2007

NCR Remembers

(Photo by Justin Davenport)

A moving harp solo by Virginia Tech National Capital Region alumnus Christine Van Dyke, melodic tolling bells, and a moment of silence set a somber, yet hopeful tone as faculty, staff, students, and alumni gathered at the Northern Virginia Center (NVC) in Falls Church for the dedication of a bronze plaque mounted on Hokie Stone. The plaque marks the site of a bench, also made from Hokie Stone, and a Japanese maple tree dedicated last summer in honor of those who lost their lives on April 16, 2007.

"This small site gives us a place where we can come to reflect and remember that while spring has been a time of great tragedy in our community, it is also a time of replenishment, beauty, and hope,"said Jim Bohland, vice president and executive director of National Capital Region Operations...




National Capital Region Alumni Association kicks off VirginiaTechforLife nationwide blood drive program in Alexandria; second drive scheduled April 16 at Northern Virginia Center

Jeff Gowen and Keri Kennedy

WAAC students Jeff Gowen
and Keri Kennedy

The National Capital Region Virginia Tech Alumni Association kicked off the VirginiaTechforLife campaign at the local office of the American Red Cross in Old Town Alexandria on April 1. This was the first of more than 30 blood drives sponsored by Virginia Tech alumni chapters across the country during the month of April,

A second blood drive, at the Northern Virginia Center, 7054 Haycock Road, will be held on April 16, from 2 to 8 p.m. Walk-ins are welcome, but appointments are preferred. To set up an appointment to donate call:
1 800-GIVE LIFE...




NCR graduate students Vidhya Dass and Elizabeth Brennan take spotlight in Washington Post Metro section on Saturday, March 29, for offering futuristic alternatives to traditional peak cherry blossom forecasts

Cherry Blossoms

(Photo by Lois Raimondo, The Washington Post)

Using computer modeling/artificial intelligence they learned in a class taught by Chang-Tien Liu, assistant professor, Computer Science, Dass
and Brennan worked with Rob DeFeo, National Park Service chief horticulturist, who, for 16 years, has been consulting nature to determine when the cherry blossoms will bloom in Washington....




Cargo honored with meritorious service award from ODK and invited to speak at celebration of newly named Lodestar Center for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Innovation at ASU

Russ Cargo

(Photo by Felipe Ruiz,
Arizona State University)

Russ Cargo, director of the Nonprofit and Civil Society Program in the Virginia Tech Institute for Policy and Governance (IPG), National Capital Region, has garnered recognition among his peers in the field of philanthropy and nonprofit leadership both through his work at Virginia Tech and his role as president of the Nonprofit Academic Centers Council (NACC).

Cargo was recently awarded the Eldridge W. Roark, Jr., Meritorious Service Award at the 2008 Omicron Delta Kappa (ODK) Society, Inc., National Leadership Summit and Convention held in Atlanta. The honor recognizes his work as director of the organization's signature leadership development program, Campus Leaders Today, Community Leaders Tomorrow (CLT2) since its inception in 2004...



Three WAAC students design finalist entry for Washington Post Peeps contest

WAAC Peeps

(Photo by Matt Valentine)

"Peeps Atop a Skyscraper (c. 1932)", a diorama designed by three Virginia Tech Washington-Alexandria Architecture Center (WAAC) students -- Lesley Golenor, Jenn Seiss, and Matt Valentine Peeps - is a finalist in The Washington Post Peeps Show II contest.

Thirty-seven dioramas made with Marshmallow Peeps were chosen as finalists from more than 800 entries sent to the Post for the second annual competition ...






Fun With Physics draws crowd of all ages at Northern Virginia Center

Fun With Physics

Nearly 200 enthusiastic visitors, ranging from primary school age students to retired Virginia Tech alumni, gathered at the Northern Virginia Center in Falls Church recently for Fun with Physics, a family-friendly afternoon event designed to prove that science can be fun, fascinating, and exciting. The event was sponsored by Virginia Tech's Department of Physics and the College of Science.

Students from the Physics Outreach Team, equipped with dozens of hands-on demonstrations and physics-related toys, introduced some intriguing phenomena. Optical illusions showed coins in the wrong place, and metal rings were tossed high in the air by the effects of electromagnetic induction...



Two grants awarded to Advanced Research Institute to study smart grid

ARI projects collage

The U.S. National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Defense Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program have both awarded grants to the Advanced Research Institute, Virginia Tech, National Capital Region, to build simulation-based models of an Intelligent Distributed Autonomous Power System (IDAPS) microgrid. Components of an IDAPS microgrid include distributed energy resources (DERs), grid interfaces, distribution circuits, customer loads, and an IP-addressable control architecture that represents the decision support system of the smart grid...



Traveling exhibit honoring life of civil rights champion and educator, Mary Ellen Henderson, runs through March 1 at Northern Virginia Center

Henderson Exhibit

(Photo by Justin Davenport)

In celebration of Black History Month, Virginia Tech's Northern Virginia Center(NVC) is hosting A Radiant Spirit: the Journey of Mary Ellen Henderson, a traveling exhibit honoring local area civil rights champion and educator, Mary Ellen Henderson.

Henderson, a long-time Falls Church resident and educator, worked tirelessly as teacher, principal, and social activist to achieve equal rights for African Americans. She was a beloved teacher and principal of the Falls Church Colored School for 31 years. On September 18, 2005, the Mary Ellen Henderson Middle School in Falls Church, was named in her honor on what would have been her 120th birthday...



CPAP student Beth Offenbacker receives prestigious award from American Society of Public Administration

Beth Offenbacker

 

Beth Offenbacker, a Ph.D. student in the School of Public Administration and Policy (CPAP), Virginia Tech, National Capital Region, has been awarded the prestigious 2008 James E. Webb Award by the American Society of Public Administration (ASPA) for presenting the most outstanding paper at the organization's 2007 annual conference.

Offenbacker's presentation, "New Zealand Local Government: Creating a Meaningful Connection Between Participatory Budgeting and Performance Budgeting," was chosen for the award from among all papers presented at the annual ASPA conference...



CPAP honors Distinguished Professor John Rohr at reception in Alexandria

Cuykendall and Rohr

CPAP student Emily Cuykendall
greets Prof. Rohr as he arrives
at CPAP, Alexandria

John Rohr, Distinguished Professor, Center for Public Administration and Policy (CPAP), was honored recently at Virginia Tech's Alexandria campus on the occasion of his impending retirement from the university after 29 years of service. Recent Ph.D. graduates Gail Ledford, and Anne Simeone, current Ph.D.students James Meutzel, John O'Brien, and Beth Offenbacker, Visiting Professor Colleen Woodward, and Melony Price-Rhodes, project director, Institute for Public Policy and Governance, made special presentations for Professor Rohr before nearly 50 CPAP students, faculty, staff, and friends...



Washington Alexandria Architecture Center hosts president of Bahcesehir University

President of Bahcesehir University at WAAC

(Left to right) Jaan Holt, director, Washington Alexandria Architecture Center (WAAC) in the School of Architecture + Design, Virginia Tech, National Capital Region, Deniz Ülke Aribogan, president, Bahcesehir University, Turkey, Kaan Okten, vice rector, Bahcesehir University, and Jack Davis, dean, College of Architecture and Urban Studies toured the college's facilities in Alexandria recently, following Ülke Aribogan's guest lecture on Fighting Terrorism not Terrorists: Turkey and the PKK...



Cargo invited to speak at Mandel Center dedication

Russell Cargo

 

Russell Cargo, director, Nonprofit and Civil Society Program, Virginia Tech Institute for Policy and Governance (IPG), was an invited speaker at the recent dedication of the Mandel Center for Nonprofit Organizations on the Case Western Reserve University campus, Cleveland, Ohio. One of the first nonprofit academic centers in the country, the Mandel Center is now the first to be housed in its own building.

"In so many ways, the Mandel Center has been a leading contributor both to the remarkable growth and recognition of the nonprofit sector and to the development of nonprofit management as an academic discipline," said Cargo...



Michael Badawy chairs only National Academy of Management Session web cast globally

Michael Badawy

 

Michael Badawy, professor, Management of Technology and Strategic Management, Pamplin College of Business, National Capital Region, recently organized and chaired an "All Academy Show Case Session," at the Annual National Academy of Management conference recently held in Philadelphia. The session title was How Can Business Schools Do Well by Doing Good? An Action Agenda for Refocusing Business Education. Badawy's session was the only one chosen by the National Academy Program Committee to be web cast live and globally a first in the Academy's 70-year history...






Virginia Tech Board of Visitors benefits from George Nolen's business and leadership acumen, serves on Finance and Audit Committee

George Nolen

 

What do New York City, northern Virginia, and Blacksburg have in common?

They are all considered home to Board of Visitors member George Nolen. And for good reason.

As president and chief executive officer of Siemens Corporation, Nolen divides his time between New York City and Reston, Virginia. But, he says, there is a third place where he always feels at home and that is Blacksburg. "Blacksburg and Virginia Tech provide a strong centerpiece for my family," Nolen says.

Nolen, one of seven children, grew up in the Washington D.C. area...



Virginia Tech, Hannon Armstrong, and Pepco Energy Services have launched an Energy Efficiency Partnership aimed at 'greeting' Greater Washington D.C.

EEP Launch

President Charles W. Steger, launching
the Energy Efficiency Parternship

Energy efficiency financier Hannon Armstrong has committed $500 million over the next five years for retrofits that will decrease energy use and significantly cut carbon emissions...



Alumnus Mike Anzilotti serves on Board of Visitors, focuses on university goals to achieve diversity and promote Hokies Respect

Mike Anzilotti

 

Hokie Spirit is something that Michael Anzilotti, president of Virginia Commerce Bancorp Inc., and member of the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors, knows a lot about - from personal experience.

He will proudly tell you he is a graduate of Virginia Tech, as are his two children, and his daughter-in-law. And one day he hopes to boast that his four grandchildren are graduates of the university, too. "They're young, but we're already dressing them up in Hokie attire," he quips.

Anzilotti has been an active alumnus since earning an undergraduate degree from the Pamplin School of Business in 1971...



Dedication drives Shelley Duke's commitment to Virginia Tech, serves on Board of Visitors and EMC Council

Shelley Duke

 

Native Californian Shelley Duke found her way to Virginia Tech more than two decades ago via the Marion DuPont Scott Equine Medical Center (EMC) in Leesburg, one of the three campuses of the Virginia -Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine (VMRCVM). Duke, owner and manager of Rallywood Farms for the past 12 years, entrusted her horses' care to veterinarians at the EMC, and ultimately, became a major supporter of and advocate for the Center. Former EMC director, Dr. Frederick Fregin asked Duke to launch a volunteer program for the EMC hospital. The success of that program led her to an appointment on the VMRCVM Advisory Committee, and an introduction to the Blacksburg campus, which she embraced wholeheartedly. She was appointed to the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors by Governor Mark Warner in 2005...



The Hope Project launched to serve disabled veterans with traumatic brain injury and their families

Talbot and Callahan

Marianne Talbot and Vince Callahan

Recently, a dedicated group of elected officials, educators, and health and human services agency representatives from the national capital region gathered at Virginia Tech's Northern Virginia Center (NVC) in Falls Church, Virginia, to kick off The Hope Project. This project will serve disabled veterans with traumatic brain injury and their families. The project is a result of the unwavering efforts of Marianne Talbot, Ph.D., a recent graduate of Virginia Tech's Human Development program and president of the National Rehabilitation and Rediscovery Foundation, Inc., (NRRF), the lead agency for The Hope Project...



Toal's research in war-torn Bosnia featured in Virginia Tech Research magazine

Gerard Toal

 

Gerard Toal, professor of Government and International Affairs, and Director of Virginia Tech's Master of Public and International Affairs Program in the National Capital Region, studies war and the roadblocks to recovery in Bosnia as local, national, and international agencies try to cope with disruptions to people, economies, and environments.

His story appears in the latest issue of Virginia Tech Research magazine...